http://canes.creighton.edu

Chair: Martha Habash
Department Office: Humanities Building, Room 205

The Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies develops diverse perspectives and understandings through the study of ancient languages (Greek, Latin, Arabic, and Hebrew), literatures, and cultures. This study yields analytical, critical and creative insights as students encounter and respond to written works and material culture of Greece, Rome, and the Near East.

Majors in Classical and Near Eastern Studies

Specific Requirements for Admission to Classical Languages Major

Satisfactory completion of the 111-112-225 sequence (or equivalent) in the track-language. Satisfactory completion of CNE/GRK/LAT 300.

Minors in Classical and Near Eastern Studies

Courses

ARA 111. Beginning Arabic for Daily Life I. 4 credits.

This course introduces students to the language by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Arabic is spoken.

ARA 112. Beginning Arabic for Daily Life II. 4 credits.

This course continues to develop the language-learning process by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Arabic is spoken. P: ARA 111 or placement.

ARA 225. Intermediate Arabic. 3 credits.

This course is designed to help students make the transition to natural communication and develop the language-learning process by focusing on the expansion of necessary elements for development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) by using cultural and literary readings as well as grammatical exercises. It also provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Arabic is spoken. P: ARA 112 or equivalent.

CNE 170. Love, Marriage and the Family in Classical Antiquity. 3 credits.

By analyzing ancient texts and material culture, this course explores how the Greeks and Romans defined and experienced family, with an eye to issues of diversity and social justice. Questions addressed include who had the right to marry, reasons for marriage, the status of marriage, definitions of marriage, divorce, the roles of men, women, and children in the family and household religion, and how the experience of family differed by status (male, female, child, slave, freedman). CO: COM 101.

CNE 171. War in Literature. 3 credits.

This literary study of war invites students to consider via readings from various authors, genres, and cultures social justice issues such as the justifications for wars and their toll on human resources, values, and lives from antiquity through the present day. CO: COM 101.

CNE 172. Muhammad in Muslim Life and Thought. 3 credits.

Future relations with the Muslim world depends on understanding Muslim devotion to Muhammad. We will explore this devotion by examining Muhammad's depiction in literature and popular rituals. We will also examine how his legacy continues to be (re)constructed by Muslims with competing socio-political agendas, i.e., conservative, liberal, and progressive. CO: COM 101.

CNE 220. World Literature I: Antiquity to Renaissance. 3 credits. (Same as ENG 220)

An introduction to Western and non-Western world literatures chosen from the ancient period to the Renaissance, with particular emphasis on gender, ethnic, and cultural diversity. P: One Magis Core Curriculum Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 230. Make 'Em Laugh: Serious Topics in Humorous Greek and Roman Literature. 3 credits.

This course is a survey of Greek and Roman humorous genres. Focus will be on typical topics and themes explored in these various genres, how the genre affects the presentation of these topics and themes, and how these topics and themes reflect the attitudes of the cultures in which they were written. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 231. Topics in Arabic Literature in Translation. 3 credits.

This course is a survey of the history, composition, and structure of The Arabian Nights, with selected reading of some of its central tales. What is the tales' origin? Who "wrote" them? Why do they continue to enchant Westerners? And what does it reveal about the Islamic world and Western engagement therewith? P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 232. Heroes, Ghosts, Witches, Gods and Monsters: Classical Mythology. 3 credits.

Nature and funciton of myth and legen; artistic, religious, psychological, and anthropological implications; influence on early and later literature and on art. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 233. The Hero in Antiquity. 3 credits.

Literary criticism of a broad range of ancient literature, including ipic, tragedy, comedy, lyric poetry, and philosophical dialogues, with special focus on the role of herosim within society. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 234. Epic Literature. 3 credits. SP

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid, and, for purposes of comparison, the Epic of Gilgamesh and other epic literature with attention to cultural context, the heroic character, and poetic technique. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 280. Sport and Athletics in the Ancient Mediterranean. 3 credits. (Same as HIS 280)

This course explores the critical role of athletics and sport in the ancient Mediterranean. Sport was fundamentally linked to social and cultural identity and usually performed in public, often religious or funerary, celebration. The course will end with an overview of the legacy of ancient sport, especially the revival of the Olympic Games. P: One Magis Core Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 281. Ancient Greece. 3 credits.

This course is an introduction to the history of Greece from the Minoans in the 12th century B.C.E. through the fall of Greece to Rome in 146 B.C.E., with a particular focus on the political, social, and cultural developments. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 282. Ancient Rome. 3 credits.

This course is an introduction to Roman history from the Founding of Rome in the 8th century B.C.E., through the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century A.D., with a particular focus on the political, social, and cultural developments. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

CNE 300. Introduction to the Ancient Mediterranean World. 3 credits. SP (Same as GRK 300, LAT 300)

General introduction to the ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek and Roman world, focusing on the history, literature, material culture, religion and/or philosophy of each culture. Readings from ancient and modern sources.

CNE 303. Introduction to the Early Medieval World. 3 credits. OD

A general interdisciplinary introduction to the early Medieval World in the Latin West. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines, such as history, literature, religion, philosophy, theology, art, and music.

CNE 304. Introduction to the Later Medieval World. 3 credits. OD

A general interdisciplinary introduction to the later Medieval World in the Latin West. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines, such as history, literature, religion, philosophy, theology, art, and music.

CNE 315. Religions In The Greco-Roman World. 3 credits. OD

Beliefs and rituals of the religions of ancient Greece and Rome, including the mystery religions.

CNE 316. Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Hellenistic Egypt. 3 credits. (Same as WGS 316)

Survey of aspects of women's lives in Greek and Greco-Egyptian antiquity incorporating the evidence of art, literature, and archaeology: study of the constructs of the female and the feminine. Readings from ancient and modern sources. P: So. stdg.

CNE 317. Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Rome and Roman Egypt. 3 credits. (Same as WGS 317)

Survey of aspects of women's lives in Roman and Roman-Egyptian antiquity incorporating the evidence of art, literature, and archaeology; study of the constructs of gender and gender roles. Readings from ancient and modern sources. P: So. stdg.

CNE 323. Classical Greek Drama. 3 credits. OD (Same as THR 323)

Selected works of Greek dramatists. The influence of Greek drama on English literature and on modern drama.

CNE 348. Muhammad And The Rise Of Islam. 3 credits. OD (Same as HIS 348)

The course examines the emergence and flowering of Islamic civilization from the time of the prophet, Muhammad, until the sack of Baghdad by the Mongols in 1258. Topics include Muhammand's prophetic mission, the Arab Kingdom of Damascus, the rise of the Abbasids, and the classical civilization of the High Caliphate. P: So. stdg.

CNE 349. Egyptian Art And Archaeology. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 349, HIS 349, THL 349)

This course will explore the history, society, culture, and religion of ancient Egypt from the predynastic era through the Ptolemaic period, as revealed through its artistic and material remains. Attention will be given to how sculpture, painting, architecture, and other material remains provide a window on Egyptian life and thought. P: So. stdg.

CNE 350. Archaeology of Israel & Jordan. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 350, HIS 350, THL 350)

A chronological survey of the archaeology of Israel and Jordan, providing a material perspective on the history of society, economy, and religion of the people from the Neolithic period to the Byzantine Period.

CNE 351. Warfare in the Classical World. 3 credits. (Same as HIS 351)

This course will study warfare as it was conducted and imagined in the Greek and Roman worlds. Using both primary evidence and secondary scholarship, we will examine practical manuals of tactics and siege warfare, as well as literary works from a variety of genres. We will also consider material evidence, such as visual and monumental depictions of warfare, and their role in producing cultural meaning.

CNE 354. Greek Art and Archaeology. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 354)

Study of the sculpture, painting, architecture, and sites of ancient Greece with emphasis on their archaeological, historical, and geographical aspects.

CNE 357. Ancient Near Eastern Art And Archaeology. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 357)

History of painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts in the Ancient Near East from c. 3500 B.C. to the conquest of Achaemenid Persia by Alexander the Great in 331 B.C. Regionally, the course will survey the arts in Mesopotamia, in such peripheral areas as Anatolia and the Levant, and in ancient Iran.

CNE 358. An Introduction to Roman Law. 3 credits. OD

An introduction to Roman Civil, Constitutional, and Criminal Law. Civil Law will be studied topically and through cases. Constitutional and Criminal Law are studied in their historical development and topically, through case studies. Careful thinking, the special genius of Roman Law, and its impact on the modern world will be major themes of the course. No previous experience in Classical Studies or Latin required.

CNE 360. History of Mediaeval Ethics. 3 credits. (Same as PHL 360)

An investigation of mediaeval ethics, tracing its roots in classical antiquity and religious tradition, outlining its innovations, and outlining the ways in which it lays the foundations of modern ethics. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course and One Magis Core Ethics course.

CNE 362. Imaging Christ: The Challenge of Early Christian Art. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 362)

Study of the development of early Christian architecture, painting, sculpture, and industrial arts; archaeological excavation of early churches and catacombs with emphasis on problems of interpretation; Western and Byzantine iconography.

CNE 365. Greek Art. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 365)

Sculpture, painting, and the minor arts of Greece.

CNE 366. Etruscan and Roman Art. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 366)

Sculpture, painting, and the minor arts of the Etrusco-Roman people.

CNE 369. Medieval Art and Architecture. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARG 369)

Architecture, painting, and sculpture of Europe from the 4th century to the 14th century.

CNE 370. History Of Classical Greek Philosophy. 3 credits. AY (Same as PHL 370)

Examination of the origins and development of Western philosophy during the Classical period in ancient Greece; the pre-Socratics; Socrates and the Sophists; substantial study of the works of Plato and Aristotle. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

CNE 371. History Of Hellenistic Philosophy. 3 credits. AY (Same as PHL 371)

Examination of the development of Western philosophy after Aristotle during the Hellenistic period in ancient Greece and imperial Rome. The study of Epicureanism (pleasure is the highest good), Stoicism (living in agreement with nature is the highest good), Skepticism (peace of mind is gained by suspending one's judgment on all dogmatic claims to truth), and Neo-Platonism. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, or PHL 320, or PHL 399.

CNE 372. History of Medieval Philosophy. 3 credits. AY (Same as PHL 372)

Study of St. Augustine and the development of Scholasticism; the Arab commentators; the achievements of St. Thomas Aquinas; Duns Scotus; William of Ockham and the rise of nominalism. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, or PHL 320, PHL 399.

CNE 401. Greek History to the Peloponnesian War. 3 credits. AY, FA (Same as HIS 401)

The political and social history of Greece, with excurses into its material culture, from prehistoric times through the end of the Peloponnesian War.

CNE 402. Alexander the Great and His Legacy. 3 credits.

The political and social history of Greece from the end of the Peloponnesian War through the fall of Greece to Rome in 146 B.C. Emphasis will be placed on Alexander's conquests and the lasting influence of Hellenistic political, social, and cultural institutions.

CNE 403. The Roman Republic. 3 credits. AY, FA (Same as HIS 403)

The political and social history of Rome with excurses into material culture covering developments from the Bronze Age to the end of the Roman Republic. Some emphasis will be placed on the political structures of the Republic, both in seeking the antecedents of the American constitution and in analyzing the causes of the Republic's fall.

CNE 404. The Roman Empire. 3 credits. AY, SP (Same as HIS 404)

The political and social history of the Roman Empire, with excusus into its material culture, from the Age of Augustus through the reign of Constantine the Great. Emphasis will be placed on the provinces and the diverse ethnic groups within the Empire.

CNE 410. Stoicism. 3 credits. OD (Same as PHL 410)

Study of the philosophy originated by Zeno of Citium in the Stoa Poikile in Athens around 300 BCE and the influence of Stoicism in the history of Western philosophy. Investigation of the Stoic system of physics, logic, and ethics; the doctrines of naturalism, rationalism, fatalism, providence, cosmopolitanism, autarky, apatheia, and suicide. Possible topics include philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, freedom and determinism, and political philosophy. P: PHL 107, and one of the following: (a) PHL 201, (b) PHL 250, (c) PHL 312, or (d) PHL 320.

CNE 418. Great Empires of the Near East. 3 credits. (Same as HIS 418)

This course will examine the history, culture, and society of the peoples of Mesopotamia, including the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Hittites, and Persians. Focus will be given to their distinctive institutions and world-views and how these are expressed through their cultural artifacts and social system.

CNE 419. Ancient Egypt: History, Society and Culture. 3 credits. (Same as HIS 419)

This course will explore the history, society, economy, and religion of ancient Egypt from the predynastic era through the Ptolemaic period, as revealed through its artistic and material remains. Attention will be given to how sculpture, painting, architecture, and other material remains provide a window on Egyptian life and thought.

CNE 420. Selected Topics In Ancient History. 3 credits. OD (Same as HIS 420)

Topical approach to selected problems or special periods in ancient history. Course will be subtitled in the Schedule of Courses. Course is repeatable as long as subtitle is different.

CNE 423. Greek and Roman Comedy. 3 credits. OD

Origins, literary characteristics, and influence of Greek Old and New Comedy and Roman Comedy: Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence. Theory of the comic.

CNE 430. Selected Topics In Ancient Art And Archaeology. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 430)

Topical or regional focus in the area of ancient art and/or archaeology. Course will be subtitled in the Schedule of Courses. Course is repeatable as long as subtitle is different.

CNE 440. Selected Topics In Classical Literature. 3 credits. OD

Topical approach to selected problems or themes in ancient literature. Course will be subtitled in the Schedule of Courses. Course is repeatable as long as subtitle is different.

CNE 461. The City of Rome in Antiquity. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 461)

An Architectural, Artistic, and Social Historical Survey of the city of Rome, concentrating on the ancient city but also tracing its development (as appropriate) through modern times. Political History will be covered to the extent needed to provide a framework for the course, but does not overlap with CNE/HIS 404.

CNE 462. Homer, Troy and the Trojan War. 3 credits. OD

Study of the literature, mythology, art and archaeology connected with the Trojan War. An examination of the historicity of the Trojan war, with discussion of questions such as: can literature be used as a guide to archaeology? Can the archaeological record confirm or deny the reality of the Trojan War?.

CNE 464. Selected Topics in Ancient Philosophy. 3 credits. OD (Same as PHL 464)

Topic approach to selected problems or themes in ancient philosophy, or focus on an individual philosopher or school of philosophy. Course will be subtitled in the Schedule of Courses. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

CNE 465. The City of Rome since Antiquity. 3 credits. (Same as ARH 465)

An architectural, urban, and social historical survey of the city of Rome from the end of the Empire, through the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and ending with the modern city. The class will focus on urban history, theory and design, but will cover political history to the extent needed to provide a framework for the course.

CNE 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits. FA, SP, SU

Credit by arrangement. Designed to meet the special needs of qualified students. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: DC.

CNE 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-3 credits. OD

May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: DC.

CNE 498. Senior Capstone Seminar. 3 credits. FA (Same as GRK 498, LAT 498)

Directed research on a general topic; preparation and public presentation of a senior thesis. CNE 498 open only to Classics majors.

CNE 520. The Dead Sea Scrolls. 3 credits. OD (Same as THL 520)

Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls and various theories about their origin. Exploration of the light they shed on the textual history of the Hebrew Bible, developments in ancient Judaism, and the early history of Christianity. P:THL 100 and a 200-level Scripture Course and Jr. stdg.

CNE 523. Israelite Religions. 3 credits. (Same as THL 523)

This course will examine the manifold expressions of Israelite religions - biblical, archaeological, and epigraphic. Emphasis will be placed on the diversity of Israelite religions and the relationship of Israelite religions to the religions of her Near Eastern neighbors.P: Jr. stdg.

CNE 524. History of Ancient Israel. 3 credits. OD (Same as HIS 524, THL 524)

An examination and reconstruction of the history of ancient Israel from biblical and other ancient New Eastern literary texts, and from archaeological and epigraphic materials. P: THL 100 and a 200-level Scripture course and Jr. stdg.

CNE 525. Archaeological Fieldwork And Analysis. 3 credits. SU (Same as ANT 525, THL 525)

The student learns the principles of stratigraphic archaeology (or underwater archaeology) by participating in an excavation for a minimum of four weeks. The student will learn stratigraphic theory and excavation strategy, basic archaeological techniques, and the basic analysis of archaeological materials recovered from the site. (Underwater archaeologists will learn basic underwater techniques in place of some terrestrial methods.) CO: CNE 526.

CNE 526. Archaeology Of Roman Palestine. 3 credits. SU (Same as ANT 526, THL 526)

This is a study of ancient Palestine from the rise of the Herodian dynasty in the first century BCE to the aftermath of the Muslim conquest in the seventh century CE. The material of the course is the physical remains of archaeological sites throughout modern Israel, along with movable cultural remains that issued from these sites. The major focus of the course will be the interaction between classical Mediterranean civilization on the one hand, and the Jews and other Middle Eastern peoples on the other, in the age that yielded Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. CO: CNE 525.

CNE 529. Translations of the Bible. 3 credits. OD (Same as THL 529)

Various ancient translations of the Bible and their significance. P: THL 100 and a 200-level Scripture course and Jr. stdg.

CNE 535. Exploring Italy. 3 credits. (Same as ITA 535, ARH 535)

Students will learn the history of culinary culture, including cuisine, food production, and artisnal activity, through a week spent in Umbria. Students will then learn about the great political and artistic patrimony of Italy in the city of Rome, covering all periods of the city but with a special emphasis on the ancient and the modern city.

GRK 111. Beginning Greek I. 4 credits.

Course designed to focus on the basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of Ancient Greek as well as provide insight into ancient Greek culture.

GRK 112. Beginning Greek II. 4 credits.

Course designed to continue the introduction of the basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of Ancient Greek as well as provide insight into ancient Greek culture. In addition, selections from major authors of Greek prose will be read. P: GRK 111 or equivalent.

GRK 225. Intermediate Greek. 3 credits.

Selections from major Greek authors of prose and poetry. Intensive review of grammar and syntax. This course applies and extends the language study completed in GRK 111 and GRK 112. P: GRK 112.

GRK 301. Readings in Greek. 3 credits.

Selected readings of major Greek authors, such as Homer, Herodotus, or Lysias. Review of Greek grammar and syntax. Study of the prose and poetic styles of the authors read. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 303. Greek Prose Composition. 3 credits. AY, SP

This course provides a comprehensive review of ancient Greek morphology and syntax by means of composition. Students will closely analyze passages from several classical prose authors and attempt to imitate their various styles in their own writing of Greek. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 400. Archaic Greek Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Archaic period (such as Homer, Hesiod, or individual lyric poets). This course may be repeated to a max of six credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 401. Archaic Greek Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Archaic period (such as epic or lyric). This course is repeatable to a max of 6 credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 402. Classical Greek Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Classical period (such as Aeschylus, Thucydides, or Demosthenes). This course may be repeated to a max of six credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 403. Classical Greek Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Classical period (such as a focus on historiography, tragedy, problems of democracy, etc). This course may be repeated to a max of six credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 404. Post-Classical Greek Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Post-Classical period (such as Polybius, Plutarch, etc.). This course may be repeated to max of six credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 405. Post-Classical Greek Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Post-Classical period (such as a focus on inscriptions, historical topics, etc.). This course may be repeated to a max of six credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 406. Late/koine Greek Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read late-Greek or Koine authors (such as Origen or Nonnos). May be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 407. Late/koine Greek Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various late-Greek or Koine authors of the same period (such as from the Septuagint or New Testament). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 408. Byzantine Greek Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Byzantine period (such as Procopius, Photius, or Anna Comnena). May be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 409. Byzantine Greek Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Byzantine period (such as epic or historiography). May be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 410. Diachronic Readings in Greek. 3 credits.

Students will read works by Greek authors from different periods. They will be linked in any number of ways, e.g., by genre, theme, or subject matter. May be repeated to a max of six credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 411. Readings in Greek and Latin. 3 credits. (Same as LAT 411)

Students will pursue thematically-linked reading of the works of Greek and Latin authors from different periods (such as comparative readings in drama, or philosophy, or historiography). May be repeated to a max of six credits. P: GRK 225 or equiv.

GRK 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits. FA, SP, SU

Designed to meet the special needs of qualified students. Credit by arrangement. This course may be repeated to a max of six hours. P: DC.

GRK 498. Senior Capstone Seminar. 3 credits. FA (Same as CNE 498, LAT 498)

Directed research on a general topic; preparation and public presentation of a senior thesis. GRK 498 only open to Greek Majors.

LAT 111. Beginning Latin I. 4 credits.

Course designed to focus on the basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of Classical Latin as well as provide insight into Roman culture.

LAT 112. Beginning Latin II. 4 credits.

Course designed to continue the introduction of the basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of Latin as well as provide insight into Roman culture. In addition, selections from major authors of Latin prose will be read. P: LAT 111 or equivalent.

LAT 225. Intermediate Latin. 3 credits.

Selections from Cicero's orations and/or other verse authors. This course applies and extends the language study done in LAT 112. P: LAT 112.

LAT 301. Readings in Latin. 3 credits.

Selected readings of major Latin authors, such as Caesar, Vergil or the Younger Pliny. Review of Latin grammar and syntax. Study of the prose and poetic styles of the authors read. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 303. Latin Prose Composition. 3 credits. SP

Presentation of sufficient material for exercising the finer points of Latin style. Imitation of the masters of Latin style, especially Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 400. Early Latin Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Early period (such as Plautus, Cato, or Terence). This course is repeatable to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 401. Early Latin Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Early period (such as the Twelve Tables, inscriptions, or readings to explore the evolution of Latin). Course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 402. Classical Latin Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Classical period (such as Cicero, Lucretius, Catullus or Caesar). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 403. Classical Latin Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Classical period (such as a focus on epic, oratory, or historical works). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 404. Augustan Latin Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Augustan period (such as Vergil, Horace, Livy, or Ovid). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 405. Augustan Latin Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Augustan period (such as a focus on historiography, elegiac poetry, or epic). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 406. Post-Augustan/late Latin Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read authors of the Post-Augustan and late period (such as Petronius, Lucan, Tacitus, or Augustine). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 407. Post-Augustan/late Latin Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Post-Augustan and late period (such as the Latin Church Fathers or historical topics). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 408. Medieval Latin Authors. 3 credits.

Students will read various authors of the Medieval period (such as Notker, Einhard, or Aquinas). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 409. Medieval Latin Themes and Genres. 3 credits.

Students will pursue thematically-tied or genre-related readings of various authors of the Medieval period (such as a focus on history, Carolingian biography, etc.). This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 410. Diachronic Readings in Latin. 3 credits.

Students will read works by Latin authors from different periods. They will be linked in any number of ways, e.g., by genre, theme, or subject matter. This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv.

LAT 411. Readings in Greek and Latin. 3 credits. (Same as GRK 411)

Students will pursue thematically-linked reading of the works of Greek and Latin authors from different periods (such as comparative readings in drama, or philosophy, or historiography). May be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: LAT 225 or equiv. and GRK 225 or equiv.

LAT 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits. FA, SP, SU

Designed to meet the special needs of qualified students. Credit by arrangement. This course may be repeated to a max of 6 credits. P: DC.

LAT 498. Senior Capstone Seminar. 3 credits. FA (Same as CNE 498, GRK 498)

Directed research on a general topic; preparation and public presentation of a senior thesis. LAT 498 open only to Latin majors.

Faculty

Professors: Gregory S. Bucher, Leonard J. Greenspoon, Jeffrey Hause, Ronald A. Simkins, William O. Stephens

Associate Professors: Erin Averett, Martha W. Habash

Resident Assistant Professor: Kyle C. Helms

Lecturer: Musa M. Al-Hindi