http://www.creighton.edu/ccas/social-work

Program Director: Barbara Harris

The Social Work program is housed in the Department of Cultural and Social Studies. The Social Work Program's mission is "Informed by Ignatian ideals, a global perspective, social work knowledge, values, skills, ethics, history and purpose, the Social Work Program is dedicated to the formation of competent, effective entry level generalist social work practitioners, as social change agents committed to the well-being of self and others, engaging in the pursuit of social and economic justice, empowerment of vulnerable populations, human rights, and the advancement of social work knowledge including the mutual influence of research and social work practice."

The goals of the Social Work Program are:

  1. Prepare entry-level generalist practitioners who apply ethical decision-making based on the National Association of Social Work Code of Ethics, and the Ignatian charisms integrating personal and professional ideals through mature self-evaluation and self-reflection,
  2. Prepare undergraduate generalist social work practitioners grounded in evidence-informed practice, to work with individual, families, groups, organizations and communities including an understanding and applicability of the global perspective for practice and
  3. Prepare social work leaders committed to advancing social and economic justice and human rights along with reducing social and economic inequities in society.

The Social Work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Major in Social Work

Courses

SWK 261. Social Welfare Needs of Vulnerable Populations:Exploring Helping Role from Social Work Perspective. 3 credits. FA, SP

How do people become vulnerable? Is social welfare a private issues or a public concern? How are the needs of the vulnerable identified and addressed? This survey course identifies several social welfare issues such as poverty, homelessness, family neglect and abuse, mental health, health care and criminal justice. All of these areas are inherently complex revealing issues of social justice. Through study of research, exploration of cultural, personal and religious values this course examines how Social Work, like many disciplines works to assist, amend or alleviate the vulnerability of individuals, families and communities. CO: COM 101.

SWK 275. Human Behavior and the Social Environment. 4 credits. FA

Why do people behave as they do? Is it genetics, psychological conditioning, or influences from the social environment? This course provides foundational knowledge and skills to examine human behavior across the lifespan from the biological, psychological, sociological, spiritual, and cultural theoretical/developmental perspectives. It is a cross-disciplinary, intersectional approach to understanding human behavior. Focus is on translational action research.

SWK 289. Self-Care for the Helping Professions. 1 credit. FA, SP

This course provides students the opportunity to practice the Ignatian value of cura personalis by caring for the whole person. As an integrative, multi-modal approach that borrows from several theories and practices such as the spiritual exercises, yoga, breath-work, compassion fatigue and stress- management the students will explore the relationship between the mind and body to strengthen the emotional spirit. Self-care is an important practice management tool and as such students will develop self-care strategies to use while in the practice setting to enhance professional resilience. This course may be repeated once. P: SWK major or IC.

SWK 298. Economics, Policy and Social Welfare. 3 credits. SP

Examines the process of social policy development with a focus on the more vulnerable populations. Social policy will be placed in a historical and a social context. Includes skills needed for policy formulation and analysis.

SWK 299. Addictions: Substances, Processes and People. 3 credits. OD

Selected addiction theories and treatments are reviewed including substance addiction (alcohol, drugs), process addiction (gambling, sex, food, internet), and relationship addictions. Students examine the role of social workers, other professionals and friends in recognizing and managing addictive behaviors, and explore their own beliefs and values using a systems perspective.

SWK 345. Practice I - Social Work with Individuals and Families. 3 credits. FA

Introduction to the ethical and theoretical base from which generalist social workers practice. Brief overview of the methods employed by social workers providing services. CO: SWK 275 and SWK 346; or IC; SWK major.

SWK 346. Pre-Practicum. 1 credit. FA

Integrating course knowledge in a practice setting is the goal of pre-practicum. Under the supervision of a social worker students explore the ethical and theoretical base from which generalist social workers practice. Taken concurrently with SWK 345 Practice I Generalist Practice with Individuals & Families, the course begins the field practicum experience that distinguishes the social work degree. P: Social Work major, SWK 261, SWK 275, CO: SWK 345.

SWK 359. Practice II: Social Work with Groups. 3 credits. FA

Introduces students to the theory, concepts and experience in the development of group dynamics and effective group skills. Stresses development of practice skills and strategies to achieve effective group facilitation. P: SWK 345 or SWK major.

SWK 369. Insurance Coverage for the Health and Human Services. 1 credit.

Course is intended to survey the range of public and private insurance opportunities specifically focusing on insurance for the poor. Emphasis is on implementation of insurance and policy guidelines, eligibly, requirements, and application processes. The course is intended for health and human service professionals including social workers, nurses, and other mental health professionals. P: SWK 261.

SWK 371. Social Work Issues. 1-3 credits. OD

Social work issues are examined in terms of both their historical development and their implications for current social work practice. Topics vary from semester to semester.

SWK 375. Working With the Elderly. 3 credits. OD

Presentation of information concerning the theory and practice of social services to the aged. Study of both institutional and community settings.

SWK 376. Family Violence. 3 credits. OD

An exploration of the problem of family violence in American society. Issues raised by violence on the family examined from the legal, social welfare and criminal justice perspectives.

SWK 435. Practice III: Advocacy, Injustice, Oppression and Ethical Decision-making. 3 credits. SP

This course prepares undergraduate social work practitioners to advance client/system well-being through the advocacy approach. Focus Is on the applying the concepts and principles of advocacy for social and economic justice with marginalized and disenfranchised populations. Emphasis is on constructing and using ethical and professional social work frames of reference for practice and understanding the interlocking nature of race, class and gender in alleviating oppression and discrimination. P: SWK 345; CO: SWK 460, SWK 461.

SWK 460. Field Practicum Seminar I. 2 credits. FA

Seminar designed to integrate theories and skills learned in the classroom with their application in field experience. P: SWK 345; Sr. stdg. CO: SWK 359, SWK 461; SWK Major.

SWK 461. Field Practicum I. 4 credits. FA

Students are placed in community agencies delivering social welfare services for practical application of the theory and skills acquired in the classroom. On-site supervision provided by the agency and group supervision provided on campus. P: SWK 345, Sr. stdg. CO: SWK, 359, SWK 460; SWK Major.

SWK 480. Field Practicum Seminar II. 3 credits. SP

Seminar designed to integrate theories and skills learned in the classroom with their application in field experience. P: SWK 460, SWL 461; Sr. stdg. CO: SWK 481; SWK Major.

SWK 481. Field Practicum II. 4 credits. SP

Students are placed in agencies delivering social welfare services for practical application of the theory acquired in the classroom. On-site supervision provided by the agency and group supervision provided on campus. P: SWK 460, SWK 461; Sr. stdg. CO: SWK 480; SWK Major.

SWK 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-6 credits. FA, SP, SU

Survey of literature related to a topic in social work not covered in student's course work. Undertaken in close cooperation with a supervising faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Sr. stdg.; SWK Major; DC.

SWK 495. Directed Independent Study. 1-6 credits. FA, SP, SU

Student-initiated project on a focused topic in social work, utilizing library materials and involving close cooperation with a supervising faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Sr. stdg.; SWK Major; DC.

SWK 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-6 credits. FA, SP, SU

Student-initiated empirical project on a focused topic in social work, involving close coordination with a supervising faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Sr. stdg.; SWK Major; SOC 212; DC.

Faculty

Professor: Roger Bergman

Professor Emeritus: Jack Angus, Raymond Bucko S.J., Charles Harper

Associate Professors: James Ault III, Barbara J. Dilly, G.H. Grandbois, Barbara Harris, Laura L. Heineman, Dawn Irlbeck, Rebecca Murray, Alexander Roedlach

Associate Professor Emeritus: Jerry Clark

Assistant Professors: M. Renzo Rosales S.J., Ryan Wishart