University Learning Outcomes

The University Assessment Committee has articulated six university-level outcomes that are common to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional student experience.

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Knowledge and completion of all degree requirements is the responsibility of the student.  To assist, Creighton provides advisor assistance and on-line degree evaluations.

The following degree requirements are required for a bachelor's degree:

  • Minimum of 128 semester credit hours
    • minimum of 48 semester credit hours earned at Creighton, including the final 32
    • minimum of 48 semester credit hours in courses numbered 300 or above
    • minimum semester credit hours earned at Creighton in the major, as follows:
      • College of Arts and Sciences: minimum of 15
      • Heider College of Business: minimum of 15-18
      • College of Nursing: minimum of 20
      • College of Professional Studies: minimum of 15
    • Cumulative grade point average of 2.00
    • Completion of Magis Common Core Curriculum (see below) and applicable Magis College Core Curriculum (see below)
    • Completion of major requirements

Magis Common Core Curriculum

Note: The Magis Core Curriculum applies to students matriculating as an undergraduate degree-seeking student, Fall 2014 and after. 

The Magis Core Curriculum serves as the cornerstone of Creighton University education, laying a shared foundation for all undergraduate students in order to shape responsible citizens of the global community. In the Jesuit tradition, Magis is "the more", aspiring toward excellence. As Catholic, the Magis Core Curriculum provides a framework to challenge students to pursue truth in all forms through the living tradition of the Catholic Church. As Jesuit, the Magis Core Curriculum is deeply rooted in Ignatian values and the Jesuit intellectual tradition, engaging students through intimate learning communities in critical dialogue about the ultimate questions of life.

The components that constitute the Magis Core Curriculum are intentionally selected to provide a congruous liberal educational experience for all undergraduate students. Students across all colleges interact, challenge ideas, and gain a deeper appreciation for diverse perspectives and experiences, thus promoting a culture of inquiry and mutual respect. A variety of course delivery methods, including distance education, are designed to foster student engagement. The Magis Core Curriculum promotes students' ethical reasoning and critical thinking, and prepares students to respond to life's challenges with discerning intelligence and thoughtful reflection. Committed to the inherent worth and dignity of each person, students gain an appreciation of ethnic and cultural diversity in all its forms, and develop a commitment to exploration of transcendent values and the promotion of justice.

The Magis Core Curriculum is organized into four levels, with various Components in each level. Each College may designate additional College Core Components. Students must earn the designated number of credits in each Common Core and College Core categories using approved courses.

The most up-to-date list of courses that satisfy each Foundations, Explorations, Integrations or Designated Course requirement of the Magis Core Curriculum is available in the Course List for that level of the Magis Core Curriculum, linked above.

Foundations Explorations Integrations Designated Courses (1 course each)
Contemporary Composition (3 credits)Understanding Natural Science (2 credits)Intersections (3 credits)Designated Ethics
Critical Issues in Human Inquiry (3 credits)Understanding Social Science (3 credits)Designated Oral Communications
Oral Communication (1 credit)Global Perspectives in History (3 credits)Designated Written Communication
Mathematical Reasoning (2 credits)Literature (3 credits)Designated Statistical Reasoning
Philosophical Ideas (3 credits)Ethics (3 credits)Designated Technology
The Christian Tradition (3 credits)The Biblical Tradition (3 credits)

Foundations

The Foundations components are foundational in several ways. First, they insure that students have foundational skills in self-expression, that is, in writing and in speaking. Second, students are introduced to three domains of critical thinking that have, from the beginning of the Jesuit educational tradition, been seen as foundational: (a) thinking critically about human experience through the study of history and literature; (b) thinking critically about religion through the study of theology; and (c) thinking critically about thinking itself through the study of philosophy. The Foundations components should normally be completed within the first year of undergraduate study.

Contemporary Composition (3 credits)

This component introduces students to the essentials of academic writing. While themed around specific topics (see examples below), all courses will present the theory and the practice of rhetoric and composition, teaching students how to construct well-organized and well-supported arguments.  PREREQUISITE: None.  Consult the Foundations Course List for a complete list of Contemporary Composition courses.

Critical Issues in Human Inquiry (3 credits)

This multi-disciplinary component of the first-year experience will introduce students to significant questions in humanistic scholarship through a high-impact educational experience. Critical Issues in Human Inquiry courses emphasize critical and creative thinking, written and oral communication, and engagement with diversity and social justice. COREQUISITE: Oral Communication.  Consult the Foundations Course List for a complete list of Critical Issues in Human Inquiry courses.                                      

Oral Communication (1 credit)

The Oral Communication component introduces the subject matter of how to give a speech and lays the foundation on which students can then build a speaking competency. Argument construction (and fallacies), speech organization, verbal and visual support, use of technology, delivery, audience analysis, topic selection, research, information literacy and eloquentia perfecta would all be covered. Students will deliver speeches in their Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course based on what they have learned in their Oral Communication course. COREQUISITE: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course. Consult the Foundations Course List for a complete list of Oral Communication courses.

Mathematical Reasoning (2 credits)

The Mathematical Reasoning component is (1) problem-based in that it explicitly discusses real-world applications of mathematics relevant to students in business, nursing, the humanities, social sciences, or natural sciences, depending on the intended audience; and (2) focuses on communicating mathematically in myriad forms. PREREQUISITE: None.  Consult the Foundations Course List for a complete list of Mathematical Reasoning courses.

Philosophical Ideas (3 credits)

The Philosophical Ideas component explores philosophical ideas about the nature of reality, the scope of human knowledge, and the nature of a good human life through the study of primary philosophical texts. Students will study the theories and concepts that philosophers of the Western tradition have used to explore such ideas. The course will culminate in students’ developing and defending their own answers to some of the philosophical questions explored in the course. PREREQUISITE: None.  Consult the Foundations Course List for a complete list of Philosophical Ideas courses.

The Christian Tradition (3 credits)

The Christian Tradition component gives students a first taste of the lively, complex, and often tumultuous ways that Christians have, over the centuries, sought to bring critical reason to the understanding of their faith. It surveys the major teachings, history, practices, and personalities of the Christian tradition; it sets these out within a balanced account of the three principal traditions of contemporary Christianity (Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant). PREREQUISITE: None.  Consult the Foundations Course List for a complete list of The Christian Tradition courses.

Explorations

The life of the mind requires exploring, and at this level, students are asked to begin exploring widely. The genius of the university is its wide-ranging and enormously sophisticated array of disciplines. In this phase of study, students begin to explore that array, its vast and varied approaches to the profound reaches of human knowledge. All students have certain intellectual strengths that feel natural to them. All too often, students can be reluctant to explore more widely, to move outside their comfort zones. This level of exploration will push students to discover new domains and to uncover their own often hidden capabilities. The Explorations components should normally be completed within the first three years of undergraduate study.

Ethics (3 credits)

An essential first step toward helping students to become men and women for others in order to create a better, more just world is the critical study of various fundamental philosophical or theological theories about the nature and sources of moral obligation, moral virtue, justice, wisdom, and a good human life. The Ethics component involves both the study of fundamental moral theories and the use of those theories in complex practical situations. PREREQUISITE: Philosophical Ideas course. Consult the Explorations Course List for a complete list of Ethics courses.

Global Perspectives in History (3 credits)

The Global Perspectives in History component will introduce students to the distinctive disciplinary methods of historical inquiry with the intention of guiding them toward the ability to explain how significant historical developments have shaped human societies and cultures. Global Perspectives in History courses will offer a broad view of the past that supports an examination of change and continuity over a significant period of time; link particular regions with larger chronological and geographical trends in history; and analyze a combination of relevant thematic concerns such as race, gender, nation, politics, and economy. PREREQUISITE: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course.  Consult the Explorations Course List for a complete list of Global Perspectives in History courses.

Literature (3 credits)

Through an in-depth look at a specific period, form or theme in literature, the Literature component will examine how imaginative language represents and shapes the richness of what it means to be human. Attention will be paid to the transformative power of the human imagination and the role of the imagination in how we understand and explain our world. PREREQUISITE: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course.  Consult the Explorations Course List for a complete list of Literature courses.

The Biblical Tradition (3 credits)

The Biblical Tradition component introduces students to the Bible, the Old and New Testaments, through the discipline of Biblical Studies. It examines the central narratives of the Bible, but its unique emphasis is on introducing students to the sophisticated historical, social-contextual, and critical methodologies that shape any contemporary interpretation of the Bible. PREREQUISITE: The Christian Tradition course.  Consult the Explorations Course List for a complete list of The Biblical Tradition courses.

Understanding Natural Science (2 credits)

The Understanding Natural Science component helps students to understand the nature of science, the strengths and limitations of the scientific approach, the differences between science and other ways of understanding the world, the key role of science in technological developments and vice versa, and the mutual influence of science and society on each other. PREREQUISITE: None.  Consult the Explorations Course List for a complete list of Understanding Natural Science courses.

Understanding Social Science (3 credits)

The Understanding Social Science component introduces students to social science through courses that begin with an overview of what it means to “understand social science” as the study of society and human nature using theories and quantitative or qualitative analysis of data, and then present in detail fundamental concepts and theories from at least one social scientific discipline. PREREQUISITE: None.  Consult the Explorations Course List for a complete list of Understanding Social Science courses.

Integrations

As students approach completion of their undergraduate education, they need to begin to integrate what they have learned about themselves and their world. At this stage of undergraduate study, students’ programs of study will have diverged into various specialized fields of study in the various colleges and schools of the university. Different forms of integrative study will be appropriate depending upon in which college the student is enrolled. Integrations components will normally be completed within the third and fourth years of undergraduate study.

Intersections (3 credits)

The focus of the Intersections component will be on big questions that employ critical thinking skills to address issues of diversity, service, and social justice. Students and instructors will work at the intersection of intellectual inquiry and personal experience as they seek together to understand intersections in the world at large. In the best Ignatian tradition, these courses will involve research and writing as well as reflection, collaboration, and debate. PREREQUISITE: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course and senior standing.  Consult the Integrations Course List for a complete list of Intersections courses.

Designated Courses

In addition to the components of the Magis Core Curriculum listed above, students must complete 5 designated courses, 1 in each of 5 different areas. It is expected that students will complete most of these designated courses as part of their major programs of study. The rest of these courses should be completed as part of another Explorations- or Integrations-level component of the Magis Core Curriculum.

Designated Ethics (0 additional credits)

Courses that receive a designation in ethics will develop and integrate ethical thinking in a chosen academic discipline, profession, or sphere of responsibility. Each such course will involve at least one significant assignment that requires structured ethical reflection on some dimension of the student’s current or future projects. PREREQUISITE: Ethics course.  Consult the Designations Course List for a complete list of Designated Ethics courses.

Designated Oral Communication (0 additional credits)

Designated Oral Communication courses will involve intensive instruction in at least one form of oral communication that is specifically intended for a particular audience. Each such course will involve at least one significant oral communication assignment. PREREQUISITE: Oral Communication course.  Consult the Designations Course List for a complete list of Designated Oral Communication courses.

Designated Statistical Reasoning (0 additional credits)

Designated Statistical Reasoning courses will involve intensive instruction and the application of statistical methods in solving problems within a discipline. Each such course will involve at least one significant assignment or project that utilizes statistics as an essential tool for analyzing data and drawing well-founded conclusions. The goal is to equip the student with the theory and methodology that are essential to solving problems in a data-rich world. PREREQUISITE: Mathematical Reasoning course.  Consult the Designations Course List for a complete list of Designated Statistical Reasoning courses.

Designated Technology (0 additional credits)

Designated Technology courses will involve intensive instruction and the application of technology in solving problems within a discipline. Each such course will involve at least one significant assignment or project that utilizes technology as an essential tool for information gathering, analysis, and presentation. Beyond the simple use of a search engine or word processing program, students will effectively use discipline-specific software tools, as appropriate, and reflect on the role of technology in that discipline. In conjunction, students will explore the power and limitations of technology in both professional and societal terms. PREREQUISITE: None.  Consult the Designations Course List for a complete list of Designated Technology courses.

Designated Written Communication (0 additional credits)

The goal of Designated Written Communication courses is to help students develop writing skills that are appropriate to a specific discipline, which will normally be the student’s major field of study. Designated Written Communication courses must be upper-division courses that involve intensive instruction in at least one form of writing oriented toward a specific audience; at least one significant written assignment, on which the student receives substantial instructor feedback during the drafting and revision stages; and an introduction to the practice of sustained professional writing in a field and the best practices and conventions in that field. PREREQUISITE: Contemporary Composition course.  Consult the Designations Course List for a complete list of Designated Written Communication courses.

Magis Core Foundations courses

Foundations

Contemporary Composition
ENG 150Contemporary Composition:College Composition3
ENG 154Contemporary Composition:Writing About Energy3
ENG 155Contemporary Composition:Cortina Composition3
ENG 157Contemporary Composition:Advocacy and Knowledge3
Critical Issues in Human Inquiry
ARH 170Cities and People:Urban Planning and Ethical Decisions3
ARH 171Art Crime3
CNE 170Love, Marriage and the Family in Classical Antiquity3
CNE 171War in Literature3
CNE 172Muhammad in Muslim Life and Thought3
COM 170Communication across Cultures3
COM 171Friendships and Our Changing Social World3
COM 172Princesses, Brides and Mothers3
COM 173Health, Communication, and Media3
COM 174From Big Brother to Big Data: Surveillance Culture3
COM 175Diverse Family Communication on Challenging Topics3
CPS 170Power, Privilege and Difference3
EDU 170Diversity and Justice in Education3
ENG 170Literature in Life:Literature Engaging Life3
ENG 171Literature in Life:Literary Autobiography3
ENG 172Race and Identity3
ENG 173Anchors Aweigh! Transatlantic Travels in Literature3
ENG 175Slumming It: Poverty and the Novel3
HIS 170Liberalism and Its Discontents3
HIS 171Waging Peace in the Twentieth Century3
HIS 172Globalization and Leadership in Africa3
HIS 173Colonial Legacies in Asia3
HIS 174Discovering Paradise3
HIS 175History of Protest in America3
HIS 176Controversies in Science and Medicine (1900-1990)3
HIS 177Seeking God in the Medieval West3
MIL 170Introduction to Critical Thinking and the Army I0-2
MIL 171Introduction to Critical Thinking and the Army II2
SPN 170Musical Perspectives:Hearing the Hispanic World3
SWK 261Social Welfare Needs of Vulnerable Populations:Exploring Helping Role from Social Work Perspective3
THL 175The Human Induced Climate Crisis:Origins and Solutions3
THL 176Sport and Spirituality3
Oral Communication
COM 101Digital Communication Lab1
COM 152Civic Engagement through Public Communication3
Mathematical Reasoning
MTH 141Applied Calculus3
MTH 205Mathematics for the Modern World2
MTH 231Calculus for the Biological Sciences3
MTH 245Calculus I4
Philosophical Ideas
PHL 110Philosophical Ideas:Reality, Knowledge, and the Good Life3
PHL 111Philosophical Ideas:Law3
PHL 112Philosophical Ideas:Foundations of the Sciences3
PHL 113Philosophical Ideas:Nature, Time and God3
PHL 118Philosophical Ideas:Wisdom3
The Christian Tradition
THL 110The Christian Tradition, Then and Now3
THL 111The Christian Tradition:Portraits of Christians Through the Centuries3
THL 112The Christian Tradition:Global Visions3
THL 113The Christian Tradition in Dialogue3
THL 114The Christian Tradition: Exploring the Great Questions3

Magis Core Explorations Courses

Explorations

Ethics
JPS 271Philosophical Ethics: Cortina Community3
PHL 270Philosophical Ethics3
PHL 271Philosophical Ethics: Cortina Community3
PHL 272Philosophical Ethics: Poverty3
PHL 275Philosophical Ethics: Energy and Environment3
THL 270Theological Ethics: Applying Moral Principles3
THL 272Theological Ethics: Sexual and Gender Issues3
THL 273Theological Ethics: Moral Perception and Moral Blindness3
WGS 272Theological Ethics: Sexual and Gender Issues3
Global Perspectives in History
AMS 275The Twentieth Century as "The American Century3
CNE 280Sport and Athletics in the Ancient Mediterranean3
CNE 281Ancient Greece3
CNE 282Ancient Rome3
HIS 271Conquest, Piracy, and Slavery: A History of the Atlantic3
HIS 272Global Perspectives in History: Europe and the World3
HIS 273Global Perspectives in History: History of Science and Medicine3
HIS 274Global Perspectives in History: Rights and Revolutions3
HIS 275The Twentieth Century as "The American Century3
HIS 276Asia and the World: Global Perspective3
HIS 278Islam and the World3
HIS 279Medieval Encounters3
HIS 280Sport and Athletics in the Ancient Mediterranean3
HIS 285The Stuff of History: Materials That Have Shaped Our World3
HIS 287Global Perspectives in History: The Native American Experience3
HIS 324Global Perspectives in History: The Irish Experience3
Literature
CNE 220World Literature I: Antiquity to Renaissance3
CNE 230Make 'Em Laugh: Serious Topics in Humorous Greek and Roman Literature3
CNE 231Topics in Arabic Literature in Translation3
CNE 232Heroes, Ghosts, Witches, Gods and Monsters: Classical Mythology3
CNE 233The Hero in Antiquity3
CNE 234Epic Literature3
ENG 220World Literature I: Antiquity to Renaissance3
ENG 221World Literature II: Enlightenment to the Modern3
ENG 223Studies in Native American Literature3
ENG 225Dead Men Tell No Tales: Pirate Literature Through the Ages3
ENG 226Writing the Nation: Fiction in the Age of Romantic Nationalism3
GER 230Explorations: German Literature in Translation: Love/Magic in 19th and 20th Cent German Lit and Film3
ITA 230The Human Comedy: Love, Religion and Morality in Boccaccio's Decameron3
SPN 425Introduction to Literary Analysis3
Understanding Natural Science
ATS 105The Science of Climate Change2
BIO 149Biology for the Non-Science Major3
BIO 201General Biology: Organismal and Population3
CHM 111Fundamentals of General Chemistry3
CSC 121Computers and Scientific Thinking3
ERG 157Contemporary Composition:Energy in Society2
ERG 213Three Dimensional Design2
EVS 105The Science of Climate Change2
NSC 111Time's Arrow: The Evolving Universe2
PHY 105Frontiers in Astronomy2
PHY 157Sustainable Energy2
PHY 187Conceptual Physics2
PHY 201General Physics for the Life Sciences3
PHY 213General Physics for the Physical Sciences I3
PHY 221Advanced General Physics I:Modeling the Physical World3
Understanding Social Science
AMS 121American Government And Politics3
ANT 111Introduction to Anthropology: Human and Cultural Diversity3
ANT 112Introduction to Anthropology: Culture, Energy and Sustainability3
ANT 113Introduction to Anthropology: Social and Cultural Determinants of Health3
COM 211Communication Studies:Relationships, Work, and Culture3
EDU 211Exploring Child and Adolescent Development3
PLS 101Introduction to Politics3
PLS 105Introduction to World Politics3
PLS 121American Government And Politics3
PSY 201Introductory Psychology3
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology: Self and Society3
SWK 275Human Behavior and the Social Environment4
THL 199THL Transfer Credit:Magis Core3
The Biblical Tradition
THL 215The Biblical Tradition: Ancestors and Heroes3
THL 216The Biblical Tradition: The Human Question3
THL 217The Biblical Tradition: Social Justice in the Old Testament3
THL 230The Biblical Tradition: Gender, Economy, and Violence3
THL 235The Biblical Tradition: Sickness and Healing3
THL 236The Biblical Tradition: New Testament3
THL 237The Biblical Tradition: Early Christian Community and Identity3
THL 238The Biblical Tradition: The Johannine Literature3
THL 239The Biblical Tradition: The Synoptic Gospels3
THL 240The Biblical Tradition: Messiah, Prophet, and Rabbi3
Fine Arts (College of Arts & Sciences only)
ARH 210History of Western Art and Architecture I3
ARH 211History of Western Art and Artchitecture II3
ARH 219History of Western Art and Architecture3
ARH 301Topics in the History of Art3
ARH 319Art International: The Art Culture of the Global Community3
ARH 354Greek Art and Archaeology3
ARH 366Etruscan and Roman Art3
ARH 369Medieval Art and Architecture3
ARH 372History of Northern Renaissance Art and Architecture3
ARH 375History of Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture3
ARH 377Seventeenth-Century Art and Architecture3
ARH 384History of American Architecture3
ARH 385History of American Art and Architecture3
ARH 390Nineteenth Century Art3
ARH 394Modern European Art, 1900-19453
ARH 410The Lives of Artists in Film3
ARH 414The Jesuits and the Arts3
ARH 445History of Architecture and Urbanism3
ARH 450The City3
ARH 465The City of Rome since Antiquity3
ARH 475Michelangelo and the High Renaissance3
ARH 535Exploring Italy3
ART 105Art Fundamentals3
ART 153Three Dimensional Foundations I3
ART 154Figure Sculpture I3
ART 155Welded Metal Sculpture I3
ART 156Bronze Casting Sculpture I3
ART 211Introductory Ceramics3
ART 247Introduction to Printmaking3
ART 271Photo Studio I:Beginning Black and White Photography3
CNE 354Greek Art and Archaeology3
CNE 366Etruscan and Roman Art3
CNE 369Medieval Art and Architecture3
CNE 535Exploring Italy3
DAN 101Introduction to the Dance3
DAN 221Intermediate Modern Dance1-2
DAN 231Intermediate Tap/Jazz1-2
DAN 241Intermediate Ballet1-2
ENG 130Creative Writing3
GDE 324Digital Foundations for the Web3
ITA 535Exploring Italy3
MUS 212University Chorus I1
MUS 218Symphonic Band I1
MUS 220University Orchestra I1
MUS 271Voice Class3
MUS 313Chamber Choir1
THR 131Acting I3
THR 154Costume Construction3
THR 161Theatre Appreciation3
THR 215Makeup Design3
THR 271Voice Class3
Foreign Language (College of Arts & Sciences only)
ARA 112Beginning Arabic for Daily Life II4
CHN 112Beginning Chinese for Daily Life II4
FRN 110Beginning French for Daily Life II: Online Lab1
FRN 112Beginning French for Daily Life II3
FRN 225Intermediate French3
FRN 311Advanced French I3
GER 112Beginning German for Daily Life II4
GER 225Intermediate German3
GER 303German Literature and Civilization I: From the Middle Ages to 18713
GRK 112Beginning Greek II4
GRK 225Intermediate Greek3
ITA 112Beginning Italian for Daily Life II4
ITA 225Intermediate Italian3
ITA 311Advanced Italian I3
JPN 112Beginning Japanese for Daily Life II4
JPN 225Intermediate Japanese3
JPN 311Advanced Japanese I3
LAT 112Beginning Latin II4
LAT 225Intermediate Latin3
RUS 112Beginning Russian for Daily Life II4
SPN 110Beginning Spanish for Daily Life II: Online Lab1
SPN 112Beginning Spanish for Daily Life II3
SPN 225Intermediate Spanish3
SPN 311Advanced Spanish I3
SPN 350Spanish for Heritage Speaker3

Magis Core Integrations Courses

Integrations

Intersections
ANT 418Healthcare, Society and Culture3
ARH 456Art and War3
ART 401Arts and Civic Engagement: Empty Bowls3
COM 475Resistance, Performance, and Rhetoric3
COM 478Perspectives on Work-Life Balance, Wellness and Justice3
CPS 400What Really Matters:Discernment, Conscience, Compassion3
CSC 448Freedom and Security in a Digitally-Divided Society3
EDP 461The Crucified People of Today3
EDU 470Poverty in America3
HAP 404Bioethics and Society3
HAP 418Healthcare, Society and Culture3
HIS 402Intersections: History of Disability3
HIS 461History and Gender3
JPS 443Ecclesiology in Global Context3
JPS 461The Crucified People of Today3
JPS 470Poverty in America3
PHL 404Bioethics and Society3
PHL 425Sciences, Ethics & Society3
PHL 427Food, Sex, and the Good Life3
PLS 5402040 Initiative Seminar3
SOC 418Healthcare, Society and Culture3
SOC 5402040 Initiative Seminar3
SRP 448Freedom and Security in a Digital-Divided Society3
SRP 470Poverty in America3
THL 431Jesus Christ: Liberator3
THL 443Ecclesiology in Global Context3
THL 463Social Justice in Selected Global Faith Traditions3
WGS 461History and Gender3
Doing Natural Science (College of Arts & Sciences only)
ATS 113Introduction To Atmospheric Sciences3
ATS 114Introduction To Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory1
BIO 202General Biology: Cellular and Molecular3
BIO 206General Biology: Cellular and Molecular Laboratory1
ERG 221Electronics Design4
EVS 113Introduction To Atmospheric Sciences3
EVS 114Introduction To Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory1
PHY 107Introductory Astronomy3
PHY 109Introductory Astronomy3
PHY 110Astronomy Laboratory1
PHY 202General Physics for the Life Sciences II3
PHY 206General Physics Laboratory II1
PHY 214General Physics for the Physical Sciences II3
PHY 222Advanced General Physics II:Modeling the Physical World3
Doing Social Science (College of Arts & Sciences only)
AMS 323Crime, Victimization and Urban Environments3
ANT 415Social Stratification in the Dominican Republic3
ANT 442Cultural Communication3
COM 320Leadership: Theories, Styles, And Skills3
COM 360Organizational Communication Theories3
COM 361Interpersonal Communication3
COM 390Health Communication3
COM 440Gender Communication3
COM 442Cultural Communication3
COM 459Environmental Communication3
COM 462Gender, Work, and Organizing3
COM 472Communication in Close Relationships3
COM 474The Dark Side of Personal Relationships3
COM 559Environmental Communication3
EDP 362Dominican Republic in Context3
EDU 320Leadership: Theories, Styles, And Skills3
EVS 459Environmental Communication3
EVS 559Environmental Communication3
HAP 390Health Communication3
ILS 320Theories of Leadership and Organizational Change3
PLS 317Latin American Government And Politics3
PLS 322American Presidency3
PLS 325American States and Regions3
PLS 332Interest Group Politics3
PLS 340International Politics3
PSY 370Applying Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology3
SOC 323Crime, Victimization and Urban Environments3
SOC 415Social Stratification in the Dominican Republic3
SOC 440Gender Communication3
SPN 415Social Stratification in the Dominican Republic3
WGS 323Crime, Victimization, and Urban Environments3
WGS 440Gender Communication3
WGS 462Gender, Work, and Organizing3
Ultimate Questions (College of Arts & Sciences only)
PHL 300Ultimate Questions: Spirituality/Philosophy3
PHL 320Ultimate Questions: God and Persons3
THL 300Ultimate Questions: Jesus Christ, Yesterday and Today3
THL 301Divine Providence, Catholic Social Teaching, & the Problem of Climate Change3
THL 309Ultimate Questions: African Theology3
THL 315Ultimate Questions: Theology of Christian Marriage3

Magis Core Designations Courses

Designations

Ethics
ANT 312Research Design for the Social Sciences3
ART 401Arts and Civic Engagement: Empty Bowls3
CHM 496Directed Independent Research I1-2
CHM 521Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthetic Organic Methods3
CSC 448Freedom and Security in a Digitally-Divided Society3
EVS 354Environmental Ethics3
HAP 312Research Design for the Social Sciences3
HAP 331Managing The Public And Non-Profit Sectors3
HAP 404Bioethics and Society3
HAP 457Biomedical Ethics: Philosophical and Theological Approaches3
HIS 374The Politics of Heredity: Eugenics in America3
JRM 438Information Ethics3
MTH 447Mathematics in Medicine and the Life Sciences I3
MUS 364Musical Theatre History and Repertoire II3
MUS 400Music History III: 20th/21st Centuries3
NUR 474Applied Nursing Ethics3
PHL 331Moral Philosophy3
PHL 354Environmental Ethics3
PHL 404Bioethics and Society3
PHL 457Biomedical Ethics: Philosophical and Theological Approaches3
PHY 491Seminar1
PLS 331Managing The Public And Non-Profit Sectors3
SOC 312Research Design for the Social Sciences3
SPN 502Advanced Spanish Translation3
SRP 448Freedom and Security in a Digital-Divided Society3
SRP 457Biomedical Ethics: Philosophical and Theological Approaches3
THL 457Biomedical Ethics: Philosophical and Theological Approaches3
Oral Communication
BIO 559Special Topics in Physiology3
CHM 497Directed Independent Research II1-2
CHM 521Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthetic Organic Methods3
COM 462Gender, Work, and Organizing3
COM 497Senior Research in Communication Studies3
EDU 568Engaged in Math: Effective Methodologies for Pre-Service Elementary School Teachers3
EXS 491Exercise Leadership And Program Administration3
HIS 402Intersections: History of Disability3
HIS 490Advanced Research Seminar3
MUS 363Musical Theatre History and Repertoire I3
MUS 415Conducting3
NUR 372Care Management and Outcomes Improvement Practicum II5
PHL 492Senior Seminar3
PHY 491Seminar1
THL 492Senior Seminar3
WGS 462Gender, Work, and Organizing3
Statistical Reasoning
ANT 314Statistics for the Social Sciences4
BIO 341Botany4
CHM 286Chemical and Statistical Analysis Laboratory2
CHM 315Quantitative and Statistical Analysis4
COM 300Communication Research Methods3
EVS 341General Botany4
HAP 314Statistics for the Social Sciences4
JRM 440Media Research3
NUR 200Statistical Reasoning3
PHY 110Astronomy Laboratory1
PHY 302Modern Physics Laboratory1
PLS 310Political Science Research Methods0-4
PSY 370Applying Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology3
SOC 314Statistics for the Social Sciences4
Technology
ANT 314Statistics for the Social Sciences4
ARH 350Archaeology of Israel and Jordan3
BIA 253Management Information Systems3
CHM 466Instrumental Analysis Laboratory2
CNE 350Archaeology of Israel & Jordan3
COM 360Organizational Communication Theories3
DAN 355Lighting Design I3
EDU 242Computer Related Technologies In Teacher Education2
HAP 314Statistics for the Social Sciences4
HAP 334Public Policy And Health Care3
HIS 316Introduction to Digital Humanities3
HIS 350Archaeology of Israel and Jordan3
MUS 363Musical Theatre History and Repertoire I3
MUS 415Conducting3
PHL 340Philosophy of Language3
PHL 358Social And Political Philosophy3
PHY 332Optics Laboratory1
PHY 553Computational Physics3
PLS 310Political Science Research Methods0-4
PLS 334Public Policy and Healthcare3
SOC 314Statistics for the Social Sciences4
THL 350Archaeology of Israel and Jordan3
THR 355Lighting Design I3
Written Communication
ANT 312Research Design for the Social Sciences3
ARH 386The History and Aesthetics of Latin American Photography3
BIO 559Special Topics in Physiology3
CHM 342Physical Chemistry Laboratory2
CHM 521Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthetic Organic Methods3
COM 359Rhetoric and Public Culture3
HAP 312Research Design for the Social Sciences3
HAP 331Managing The Public And Non-Profit Sectors3
HIS 374The Politics of Heredity: Eugenics in America3
HIS 402Intersections: History of Disability3
HIS 490Advanced Research Seminar3
JRM 220Professional Writing3
JRM 319Media Writing3
JRM 320Professional Writing3
MUS 364Musical Theatre History and Repertoire II3
MUS 400Music History III: 20th/21st Centuries3
NUR 471Care Management and Outcomes Improvement III5
PHL 492Senior Seminar3
PHY 491Seminar1
PLS 331Managing The Public And Non-Profit Sectors3
SOC 312Research Design for the Social Sciences3
THL 492Senior Seminar3
THR 465Theatre History (5th Century, B.C.-1700)3
THR 466World Theatre History II: (1700-Present)3