Professional Component

Entry-level Doctor of Occupational Therapy Pathway

The entry-level professional doctorate curriculum in occupational therapy emphasizes the development of critical thinking skills, an understanding of research literature, and professional competence. The degree Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) is granted to students who successfully complete a program consisting of the prerequisite course work and a baccalaureate degree followed by eight semesters of professional education.

In addition to didactic course work, students in the entry-level professional OTD pathway must register for Level I Fieldwork for four didactic semesters of the curriculum beginning in the second semester. Level I Fieldwork is provided in a variety of settings covering the lifespan, including hospitals, clinics, school systems and community centers. The schedule of didactic classes is organized in such a way to assist students in accomplishing this course requirement. All fieldwork assignments are made by the Occupational Therapy Academic Fieldwork Coordinators.

Two of the eight professional semesters required for the awarding of the entry-level OTD degree are three-month Level II Fieldwork placements at supervised, approved facilities. Eligibility for Level II Fieldwork experiences is determined by the student’s mastery of the professional curriculum. In addition, a 16-week Professional Rotation experience is required during the eighth (last) semester of the curriculum. A GPA of 2.00 or higher is required for Level II Fieldwork placement.

It is the student’s responsibility to finance transportation and living accommodations for all fieldwork and Professional Rotation courses. Students should plan to travel to sites outside of the local area for both Level I and Level II Fieldwork, as well as for Professional Rotation.

Entry-level Hybrid Distance Pathway

In 2007, we began our University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA)-Creighton University Distance Pathway. This entry-level program initiative includes asynchronous and synchronous teaching and learning in a unique distance hybrid model. Students complete lab and experiential learning activities at the UAA campus.

In 2013 we began the Greater-Omaha (GO) Distance Pathway. Like the UAA-Creighton University Distance Pathway, this entry-level pathway includes asynchronous and synchronous teaching and learning in a unique distance hybrid model. Students must reside within the Greater Omaha Metropolitan Area in order to complete examinations, lab and experiential learning activities on the Creighton University campus in Omaha.

Beginning 2015, we will be entering into an exciting collaboration with Regis University in Denver, CO. This pathway will follow the successful hybrid model used to make the Alaska Pathway and the Greater Omaha Pathway so successful, and will be available to students who wish to continue their Occupational Therapy education in Denver, Colorado.

For all hybrid distance pathways, students must meet the admission requirements and criteria identical to the on-campus applicants, plus submit an additional statement articulating their interest in, and suitability for distance education.

Post-Professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy Pathway

The School initiated a post-professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) pathway in the fall of 1995. This pathway was one of the first professional OT doctoral programs of its kind in the country and is designed to strengthen occupational therapists’ professional, practice management, teaching, and administrative skills. With the expertise and credentials gained by completing this program, graduates are more able to compete for positions in a diverse range of practice environments and will be poised to lead the profession into the 21st century. In 2001, the school instituted the post-professional OTD program in a distance format to make the program readily accessible to occupational therapy practitioners who wish to pursue doctoral education while working. Students are able to access didactic coursework supportive of occupational therapy practice through various different technologies.

The post professional curriculum provides well-developed learning opportunities related to the practice of occupational therapy. In addition, the curriculum offers education in instructional and research methods in an effort to prepare students for academic as well as practice-oriented careers. Didactic coursework addresses advanced theory, knowledge, and skills in critical analysis, personnel supervision, examination of health care policy, legal and ethical parameters of practice, and quality review methodologies. Various methodologies enhance the practice relevance of the coursework.

The distance pathway, designed for practicing professionals, allows students to enroll in two or more courses per enrollment term. The introduction to clinical doctoral studies course (POTD 500), and research proposal course (POTD 554) are held on Creighton University’s campus. Once students successfully complete POTD 500, they may begin to enroll in courses to complete their plan of study.

After successful completion of POTD 580, students participate in 16 credit hours of professional rotations. Rotations can be developed in a variety of practice settings including pediatrics, industrial rehabilitation, hand rehabilitation, neonatal intensive care, private practice, psychiatry, home health, gerontology, community, cross-cultural environments and academia. Students may develop rotations in the state where they reside or where they work.

The curricula of the entry-level and post-professional doctorate in Occupational Therapy (OTD) responds to important trends in occupational therapy practice, health care, and society in general. Creigh­ton University’s professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy pathways prepare graduates to fulfill all traditional duties of occupational therapists while helping them become transformative leaders in the profession. The program is based on models of other professional doctorate degrees in health sciences such as medicine, den­tistry, pharmacy and physical therapy. The professional doctorate in Occupational Therapy at Creighton University is the first such program initiated in the United States.

For successful development as occupational therapists, membership in the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) is required of all entry-level and post-professional students. Membership in the Nebraska Occupational Therapy Association (NOTA), the Alaska Occupational Therapy Association (AKOTA), or Occupational Therapy Association of Colorado (OTACCO) is strongly recommended.

Special fees are required for purchase of professional resource and laboratory mate­rials, fieldwork expenses, NOTA or AKOTA and AOTA membership, and professional liability insurance.

Entry-Level (Campus, Distance AK, Distance CO, and Distance GO) Program

First Professional Year
FallCredits
IPE 400Introduction to Collaborative Care 0
OTD 302Occupations and Occupational Therapy 3
OTD 306Health Conditions 3
OTD 314Occupation and Health: Population Perspectives 3
OTD 316Professional Practice and Ethical Formation Seminar 4
OTD 334Foundations of Research 1.5
OTD 341Neuroanatomy 3
 Term Credits17.5
Spring
OTD 317Occupational Therapy in Mental Health 4
OTD 318Level IA Fieldwork: Mental Health 0.5
OTD 324Applied Kinesiology 3
OTD 335Research Proposal I 2
OTD 339Clinical Anatomy 3
OTD 340Clinical Anatomy Laboratory 1.5
OTD 355Physical Rehabilitation I: Evaluation 3
 Term Credits17
Summer
OTD 333Upper Extremity Evaluation and Intervention I 3
OTD 336Research Proposal II 0.5
OTD 356Physical Rehabilitation II: Neurorehabilitation 4
OTD 390Level IB Fieldwork: Physical Rehabilitation 1.5
 Term Credits9
Second Professional Year
Fall
OTD 400Research Project Implementation I 1.5
OTD 403Neuro-occupation 2
OTD 423Occupational Therapy with Older Adults 3
OTD 433Upper Extremity Evaluation and Intervention II 3
OTD 435Occupational Therapy with Children and Youth I 3
OTD 442Critical Analysis of Occupational Therapy Practice 3
OTD 460Clinical Education Seminar I 1.5
OTD 490Level IC Fieldwork: Pediatric or Selected Practice Setting 1
 Term Credits18
Spring
OTD 401Research Project Implementation II 1.5
OTD 406Management and Program Development 3
OTD 417Disability and Health Care Policy 3
OTD 436Occupational Therapy with Children and Youth II 4
OTD 457Physical Rehabilitation III: Interventions and Outcomes 4
OTD 461Clinical Education Seminar II 1.5
OTD 491Level ID Fieldwork: Pediatric or Selected Practice Setting 1
 Term Credits18
Summer
OTD 481Level II A Fieldwork 12
 Term Credits12
Third Professional Year
Fall
OTD 564Professional Identity and Ethical Perspectives in the Ignatian Tradition 3
OTD 574Professional Competency .5
OTD 571Level II B Fieldwork 12
 Term Credits15.5
Spring
OTD 600Doctoral Experiential Component 16
OTD 601Capstone 1
 Term Credits17
 Total Credits: 124

Level I, II and Entry-Level Professional Rotation are practical experiences which supplement the occupational therapy didactic courses. Students will need to arrange for travel and housing to sites which may be located in Omaha, the surrounding area, or other states or countries.

Post-Professional Distance Program

POTD 500Introduction to Clinical Doctoral Studies2
POTD 501Historical Perspectives of Occupation3
POTD 511Neuro-Occupation3
POTD 514Occupation and Health Population Perspectives3
POTD 516Health Program Management3
POTD 517Health Care Policy3
POTD 518Leadership Development3
POTD 521Occupation in Community3
POTD 541Critical Analysis of Occupational Therapy Practice3
POTD 553Introduction to Inquiry2
POTD 554Research Proposal2
POTD 555Research Implementation1.5
POTD 556Manuscript Writing1.5
POTD 562Advanced Clinical Ethics3
POTD 565Instructional Methods and Evaluation3
Electives6
POTD 580Professional Trajectory1
POTD 601Capstone1
POTD 590Doctoral Experiential Component16
Total Credits63

Successful completion of POTD 580 is required prior to placement in Post-Professional Rotation courses.

Individuals with a Master’s degree in Occupational Therapy or in a field other than Occupational Therapy can request a waiver of up to a maximum of 15 credits (or 25% of the POTD program) including didactic and professional rotation courses.

Six (6) elective credit hours are automatically waived for students who enter with a Master’s degree.  These students can request a waiver of nine (9) additional credit hours to reach the maximum of 15 allowed.

The following courses may not be waived:  POTD 500 Introduction to Clinical Doctoral Studies, POTD 580 Professional Trajectory, and POTD 601 Capstone. POTD professional rotation waived credits may not exceed 8 credits.  Individual requesting to waive professional rotation credits must submit an electronic portfolio demonstrating evidence of advanced practice.  The portfolio will be reviewed by a committee consisting of a faculty member from the Clinical Education Office, the instructor of record for POTD 590 (Professional Rotation), and the student’s assigned academic advisor using a rubric to identify advanced practice components.  If the faculty member from the Clinical Education Office or the instructor of record of POTD 590 Doctoral Experiential Component is the student’s academic advisor, the POTD Program Director will be the third member of the committee to evaluate the portfolio.  All request for didactic course waivers must be completed during the POTD 500 Introduction to Clinical Doctoral Studies course.  Requests for professional rotation course waivers must be submitted during the POTD 580 Professional Trajectory course. No requests for course waivers will be entertained prior to POTD 500 Introduction to Clinical Doctoral Studies during the admissions process.

In order to satisfy the requirements for graduation, the entry-level Doctor of Occupational Therapy and the post-professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy students must success­fully complete all requirements for admission, all required courses in their professional curriculum, and must participate in a capstone event at the end of the academic program. A cumulative grade-point average of not less than 2.00 is required for graduation based on all work attempted while enrolled in the profes­sional program. Candidates for the entry-level OTD and post-professional OTD degrees must be determined by the faculty to be of good moral character and fit for the practice of the profession, must have paid all indebtedness to the Univer­sity, and must be present at the ceremonies where the degree is conferred (unless excused under University rules). To participate in Commencement, a candidate must submit an application for degree available online through the Registrar's Office by the University deadline. In an effort to comply with accreditation and ongoing programmatic quality assurance, completion of all course evaluations and graduate exit survey is required in order for the student to be assigned a course grade and/or graduate.

Courses

IPE 400. Introduction to Collaborative Care. 0 credits.

This course is an introduction to the concepts of interprofessional collaborative practice preparing students across the health sciences to engage in interprofessional education and practice activities during their tenure at Creighton and beyond. In this course health sciences students will gain knowledge in the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice, versed in the basics of team work in the context of health care and begin to develop skills in team-based clinical reasoning.

IPE 410. Interprofessional Foundations in Patient Safety. 2-4 credits.

This course is designed to educate health professions students about the fundamental core knowledge of patient safety. Faculties representing various disciplines teach the content from a patient-centered focus within an inter-professional framework. Concepts of safe systems will serve as an over arching principle to patient safety. By engaging in a series of modules complimented by case-based exercises, participants will learn the scope of the problem of patient safety, and acquire the skills to foster a culture of continuous learning and incorporation of patient safety best practices and improvements in their own individual professional practices.

IPE 412. Cultural Immersion and Experiential Learning in China. 2-3 credits.

The focus of this course is to increase participants' cultural competency and facilitate their leadership development for societal and global concerns through interprofessional experiential learning in China. Participants will engage in a series of seminars centered on preparation for successful experiential learning in China prior to a week-long international experience. Through immersion and engagement in various professional activities such as observation, advocacy for evidence-based rehabilitation practice and consultation, participants are expected to enhance cultural competency and foster leadership skills for international health concerns. Such an experiential learning immersion will prepare participants to provide culturally sensitive care and assume leadership roles at the international level. A professional dissemination of the experiential learning experience is expected at the end of the course. P: IC.

IPE 413. Developing Care for a Vulnerable Population:An Interprofessional Collaborative Approach-Hlth Promotn. 1 credit.

This course will provide students an opportunity to collaborate to address community identified health needs in partnership with a community partner. The focus of the course is to implement interprofessional collaborative care to address health status of a population in a community setting. P: Nursing - enrollment in graduate nursing; Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Pharmacy - successful completion of second year of professional curriculum.

OTD 215. Medical Terminology. 1 credit. (Same as EMS 215)

Medical Terminology is a critical part of language and communication used by health care practitioners. This self-directed course is designed for students planning a career in the health services and related fields. Course content includes a study of basic medical terminology. Students will construct and decipher terms using prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, and abbreviations related to body systems, cavities, planes, and positions. Competency is evaluated throughout the semester through online testing.

OTD 302. Occupations and Occupational Therapy. 3 credits.

This course will introduce students to occupation as a fundamental concept of the profession of occupational therapy. Students will gain an understanding of the history and philosophical base of the profession, the domain of practice, and practice trends. Official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association, World Health Organization, and other relevant organizations will be explored. Students will be introduced to practice models of occupation and disability theory. P: Admission to the EOTD program or IC. CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 306. Health Conditions. 0-3 credits.

This course is an overview of health conditions that are pertinent to the practice of occupational therapy across the lifespan. Students will analyze etiology, signs, symptoms, pathophysiology, psychopathology, and the impact of pharmacological interventions on select health conditions and occupational performance. P: Admission to the EOTD program or IC; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 314. Occupation and Health: Population Perspectives. 3 credits.

This course will examine the role of occupation in enhancing the health of populations through health promotion, health education, and prevention of illness. Key concepts of population health, needs assessment, health promotion, and health behavior will be applied to develop local and global population-based approaches for meeting the health needs of individuals and communities. P: Admission to the EOTD program or IC. CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 316. Professional Practice and Ethical Formation Seminar. 4 credits.

This course will promote professional formation through the integration of foundational concepts and skills necessary for competent and ethical practice. Students will develop basic skills in clinical and ethical reasoning, assessment and intervention, client interaction and education. P: Admission to the EOTD program or IC. CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 317. Occupational Therapy in Mental Health. 4 credits.

This course examines occupational therapy in mental health practice, as well as the influence of psychosocial factors on occupational performance. Theory-driven practice is valued with the introduction of selected psychosocial frames of reference and/or conceptual models of mental health practice to guide the evaluation process, the selection of assessment tools, and the design of therapeutic interventions. Use of self as a therapeutic agent and group process skills will be emphasized. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 318. Level IA Fieldwork: Mental Health. 0.5 credits.

In accordance with occupational therapy accreditation standards, this course will introduce students to the fieldwork experience, facilitate application of knowledge to practice, and foster students' understanding of client needs. The focus is to immerse students in a setting where they will examine how psychological and social factors influence occupational performance in actual situations. Students will engage in directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process. This course orients students to policies, procedures, and required documentation related to clinical education. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 324. Applied Kinesiology. 0-3 credits.

This course presents foundational biomechanical and kinesiological principles necessary for the assessment of movement in relation to occupational performance. Students will apply knowledge and skills in musculoskeletal screening and assessment for people with various health conditions. Students will demonstrate the ability to interpret manual muscle testing and range of motion assessment results in order to develop intervention plans using therapeutic exercise. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 330. Spanish for Health Professionals. 2 credits. (Elective)

This course offers a concise introduction to Spanish grammar, vocabulary and culture for students whose personal or professional goals include a working knowledge of Spanish. In addition to emphasizing basic communication, this course will give special attention to the vocabulary needs of those individuals involved in the health professions.

OTD 333. Upper Extremity Evaluation and Intervention I. 0-3 credits.

This is the first in a two-course sequence that focuses on the occupational therapy process for persons with upper extremity conditions across the lifespan. Students will gain knowledge and skills in assessment and intervention, including orthotic selection and fabrication in various practice settings. Occupational engagement and continuum of care are emphasized in the course. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 334. Foundations of Research. 1.5 credit.

This is the first course in a five-course sequence designed to apply research terminology and develop foundational inquiry skills for the occupational therapy practitioner. Students will learn to distinguish types of scholarly literature and identify components of both quantitative and qualitative research. Evidence-based practice, scholarly writing and information literacy will be explored. Students will develop a literature review of a selected topic under the guidance of a faculty research mentor. P: Admission to the EOTD program or instructor consent.

OTD 335. Research Proposal I. 2 credits.

This is the second course in a five-course sequence designed to develop research skills for the occupational therapy practitioner. Students are expected to develop a methodologically sound research proposal under the guidance of a faculty research mentor while following Institutional Review Board guidelines. Emphasis is placed on quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and data analyses. P: Successful completion of a ll required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course.

OTD 336. Research Proposal II. 0.5 credits.

This is the third course in a five-course sequence designed to develop research skills for the occupational therapy practitioner. Through an internal review process, students will be expected to integrate feedback from multiple reviewers and gain approval of their research proposal from the Occupational Therapy Department Scientific Review Committee (SRC). Once approved by the SRC, students will complete and submit an application and required materials to the Institutional Review Board. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course.

OTD 339. Clinical Anatomy. 3 credits.

This course provides an overview of clinical human gross anatomy and integrates knowledge of neuroanatomy and health conditions. Understanding the anatomy of the human body aids the occupational therapist in thorough assessment and design of effective interventions, and provides knowledge of how anatomy influences occupational performance. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 340. Clinical Anatomy Laboratory. 1.5 credit.

Knowledge of human anatomy allows the occupational therapist to better assess and design effective treatment interventions, and provides the basis for appreciating how anatomy is related to and influences occupational performance. This course is designed to supplement the clinical anatomy learning experience by allowing students the opportunity to participate in dissection of human cadavers. Students will complete dissections of the upper and lower limbs and study dissections of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 341. Neuroanatomy. 3 credits.

In this course, students will identify and describe the major structural and functional features of the nervous system, with a focus on the brain and the spinal cord. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of brain functioning and its dynamic relationship with occupation. P: Admission to the EOTD program or IC: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 355. Physical Rehabilitation I: Evaluation. 0-3 credits.

This course is the first in a three-course sequence focusing on physical rehabilitation. Clinical reasoning and theory-driven practice are valued with the introduction of selected physical rehabilitation frames of reference and/or conceptual models of occupational therapy practice to guide the evaluation process, the selection of assessment tools, and the design of therapeutic goals. Students will demonstrate competence with documentation and billing requirements. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 356. Physical Rehabilitation II: Neurorehabilitation. 0-4 credits.

This course is the second in a three-course sequence focusing on physical rehabilitation. It incorporates the occupational therapy process and centers on the theoretical foundations of and intervention for clients with neurologic conditions. Students will interpret evaluation results to design client-centered and evidence-based intervention plans that promotes occupational engagement. Assistive technologies commonly used on physical rehabilitation practice settings will be explored. This course will allow students to build upon knowledge of documentation and reimbursement from previous coursework. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other courses in this semester.

OTD 386. Institute for Latin American Concerns Immersion. 3 credits.

Occupational therapy students will participate in a 2-week cross-cultural experience in the Dominican Republic focusing on the aspects of occupational therapy treatment in an international setting. A major focus of the experience will be exploration of the role of occupational therapy in an underserved global health setting utilizing the tenets of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Students will engage in cultural exploration of the Dominican culture utilizing the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and provide health-related education to multiple community partners. Implementation of treatment, patient education, reflection and discussion are the main methods used to promote student learning during the experience.

OTD 390. Level IB Fieldwork: Physical Rehabilitation. 1.5 credit.

In accordance with occupational therapy accreditation standards, this course will facilitate application of knowledge to practice and foster students' understanding of client needs. The focus is to immerse students in a setting where they will integrate physical rehabilitation theories and practice through directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process. This course orients students to policies, procedures, and required documentation related to clinical education. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other courses in this semester.

OTD 399. Directed Independent Studies. 1-6 credits. (Elective)

This course is an opportunity for motivated occupational therapy students to become involved in a course of study under the direction and guidance of a faculty in order to: (a) pursue, in depth, an area covered more generally in the curriculum; (b) explore a topic not normally covered in the curriculum; (c) provide occupational therapy services to diverse and underserved populations, or (d) assist with or conduct original problem-oriented or technique-based research in an occupational therapy area of interest. This study may be in any occupational therapy-related area of practice. In all cases, it is the student's responsibility to fully identify the topic and to acquire enough information to ensure its worthiness for independent study. A maximum of three semester hours may be taken in OTD 399.

OTD 400. Research Project Implementation I. 1.5 credit.

This is the fourth course in a five-course sequence designed to develop research skills for the occupational therapy practitioner. Students will gain knowledge and skills through the implementation of their research proposal, including initiating participant recruitment, data collection, and data analysis. Students will critically analyze and solve problems encountered during project implementation. The process will be closely monitored by the instructor of record and faculty research mentor.

OTD 401. Research Project Implementation II. 1.5 credit.

This is the fifth course in a five-course sequence designed to refine research skills for the occupational therapy practitioner. The focus is to complete the implementation of the research project and disseminate project findings. Students are expected to critically analyze and solve problems encountered during this last stage of their project. The process will be closely monitored by the instructor of record and faculty research mentor.

OTD 403. Neuro-occupation. 2 credits.

This course is an overview of the reciprocal relationship between the brain and occupation. Foundational concepts of this relationship will be discussed, including neuroscience, neuroplasticity, systems theory, nonlinear dynamics, chaos theory, complexity theory, and others. Students will develop intervention plans that support the mutual importance of occupation and neuroplasticity. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 406. Management and Program Development. 3 credits.

This course will focus on the development and management of occupational therapy services. Students will explore the health care system and apply fair business strategies to promote, develop, and expand services related to occupational therapy philosophy and practice. Budget development, management, and funding procurement through grant writing and business proposals will be applied in the process of program development. Students will examine leadership strategies and explore health care regulations and compliance issues. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 417. Disability and Health Care Policy. 3 credits.

This course involves the study of disability and health care policies and their effects on occupational therapy practice. Students will critically examine government and regulatory systems; professional societies; economic, political, and professional forces; and cultural and social values that influence the development of health care policy and contemporary practice. Students will apply advocacy skills to promote the profession and the just treatment of people with disabilities. P: Successful completion of all required coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 420. Exploring Spirituality in OT Practice. 1 credit. (Elective)

This course will explore concepts of spirituality in the OT literature and by writers from medicine, theology, and psychology. Students will actively explore their own spiritual development. They will then study how spirituality is experienced by individuals with acute or chronic illness and disability. Lastly students will apply their knowledge to occupational therapy interventions. In brief, this course will consider spirituality to be about a person's relationship with his/her inner self, with other people, and with the transcendent. A distinction will be made between spirituality and religion. P: Successful completion of year one.

OTD 423. Occupational Therapy with Older Adults. 3 credits.

This course focuses on the unique characteristics and needs of older adults. Contemporary practice issues related to productive aging, including interprofessional practice, will be emphasized. Students will examine various service delivery models and resources to support older adults and their caregivers. Evaluation and intervention to promote safety and occupational engagement in the home and community will be applied. Theories of aging, changes in body structures and functions associated with aging, and end-of-life issues will also be addressed. Students will examine current policies affecting geriatric practice and payment. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 433. Upper Extremity Evaluation and Intervention II. 3 credits.

This is the second in a two-course sequence that focuses on the occupational therapy process for persons with upper extremity conditions across the lifespan. Students will apply clinical reasoning in selecting and implementing assessments and interventions in order to safely administer physical agent modalities and other preparatory methods that enhance occupational engagement. Competency practicums will be implemented as required to meet regulatory guidelines. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 435. Occupational Therapy with Children and Youth I. 3 credits.

This course introduces students to occupational therapy practice with children and youth. It focuses on childhood development and the evaluation process, highlighting observation skills and collaboration with families and communities in the context of the natural environment. Students will examine childhood occupations and developmental milestones. They will also be introduced to evaluation and intervention planning related to selected pediatric health conditions. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 436. Occupational Therapy with Children and Youth II. 0-4 credits.

This is the second in a two-course sequence on the occupational therapy process with children and youth. It focuses on applying theories and frames of reference. Students will explore family and community interactions, interprofessional collaboration, and the assistive technology process. A variety of practice settings and service delivery models will be examined, and students will develop strategies for implementing assessments and interventions. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 442. Critical Analysis of Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 credits.

In this course, students will gain an understanding of external and internal criticisms of the profession of occupational therapy. Through student-driven learning activities, the course will emphasize the judicious use of evidence-based methods in evaluation and intervention in order to contribute to the ongoing refinement of the profession. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 457. Physical Rehabilitation III: Interventions and Outcomes. 0-4 credits.

This course is the third in a three-course sequence focusing on physical rehabilitation. It incorporates the occupational therapy process and centers on the theoretical foundations and intervention of clients with orthopedic, cardiac, pulmonary, and other health conditions. Students will formulate intervention plans that will include a final synthesis of how assistive technologies are used to enhance occupational performance. Students will be introduced to advanced practice areas and build upon knowledge of documentation and reimbursement from previous coursework. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 460. Clinical Education Seminar I. 1.5 credit.

This course is the first of a two-course sequence designed to provide structure and guidance to students for the processes of Level I and Level II fieldwork and Professional Rotation. Official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and policies related to clinical education will be discussed. Additionally, students will engage in self-directed personal and professional exploration of their identity as occupational therapy practitioners. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 461. Clinical Education Seminar II. 1.5 credit.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence designed to provide structure and guidance to students for the processes of Level I and Level II fieldwork and Professional Rotation. Official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and policies related to clinical education will be discussed. Additionally, students will engage in self-directed personal and professional exploration of their identity as occupational therapy practitioners. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 481. Level II A Fieldwork. 12 credits.

Students will apply their understanding of occupation, professional practice, professional identity, leadership, and Ignatian values during a 12-week, full-time fieldwork placement. Students will develop entry-level competency as a generalist practitioner at their site by the conclusion of this experience. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 490. Level IC Fieldwork: Pediatric or Selected Practice Setting. 1 credit.

In accordance with occupational therapy accreditation standards, this course will facilitate application of knowledge to practice and foster students' understanding of client needs. The focus is to immerse students in a setting where they will explore a pediatric practice area or other practice area of interest through directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 491. Level ID Fieldwork: Pediatric or Selected Practice Setting. 1 credit.

In accordance with occupational therapy accreditation standards, this course will facilitate application of knowledge to practice and foster students' understanding of client needs. The focus is to immerse students in a setting where they will explore a pediatric practice area or other practice area of interest through directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 564. Professional Identity and Ethical Perspectives in the Ignatian Tradition. 3 credits.

This course will use components of the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm - context, experience, reflection, action, and evaluation - as a framework for exploring the pragmatic, moral, and spiritual dimensions of occupational therapy practice. Ethical reasoning, critical thinking, discernment, and decision making will be further developed using ethically and clinically challenging cases across practice settings. Students will cultivate professional identity by examining current and future responsibilities as occupational therapy practitioners. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 571. Level II B Fieldwork. 12 credits.

Students will apply their understanding of occupation, professional practice, professional identity, leadership, and Ignatian values during a 12-week, full-time fieldwork placement. Students will develop entry-level competency as a generalist practitioner at their site by the conclusion of this experience. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 574. Professional Competency. 0.5 credits.

This course is designed to meet the doctoral-level educational standard of the American Council of Occupational Therapy Education, which mandates that students successfully complete a competency requirement before commencing the doctoral experiential component. Students will demonstrate both didactic and clinical competence. This course offers a structured way to prepare for the National Board of Certification for Occupational Therapy certification exam. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 599. Directed Independent Study. 1-4 credits. (Elective)

This course offers the opportunity for doctor of occupational therapy students to become involved in a course of study under the direction and guidance of a faculty member in lieu of a portion of the professional rotation requirements of the OTD program. Students may choose to 1) pursue, in depth, an area covered more generally in the curriculum; 2) explore a topic not normally covered in the curriculum; 3) provide occupational therapy services to diverse and underserved populations; or 4) assist with or conduct original problem-oriented or technique-based research in an occupational therapy area of interest. This study may be in any occupational therapy-related area or practice. In all cases, it is the student's responsibility to fully identify the topic and to acquire enough information to ensure its worthiness for independent study. A maximum of 4 semester hours can be taken in OTD 599. P: OTD 571, OTD 574 CO: OTD 600.

OTD 600. Doctoral Experiential Component. 13-16 credits.

This 16-week doctoral experiential component is designed for students to build upon their entry-level competence as generalist practitioners to achieve advanced skills in one or more of the following: clinical practice, research, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. Students will actualize individualized specific learning objectives in a mentored practice setting. Evidence of learning is disseminated through a culminating project. P: Successful completion of all required professional coursework preceding the offering of this course; CO: All other required courses in this semester.

OTD 601. Capstone. 1 credit.

The focus of this course is for students to complete an individually designed culminating project that relates theory to practice and demonstrates synthesis of advanced knowledge gained throughout the curriculum. Students will demonstrate integration with their doctoral experiential component.

POTD 386. Institute for Latin American Concerns Immersion. 3 credits. (Elective)

Occupational therapy students will participate in a 3-week cross-cultural experience in the Dominican Republic focusing on the aspects of occupational therapy treatment in an international setting. A major focus of the experience will be exploration of the role of occupational therapy in an underserved global health setting utilizing the tenets of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Students will engage in cultural exploration of the Dominican culture utilizing the ICF and provide health-related education to multiple community partners. Implementation of treatment, patient education, reflection and discussion are the main methods used to promote student learning during the experience. Post-professional students will also act as mentors to entry-level OTD students in small rehabilitation teams.

POTD 420. Exploring Spirituality in Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 credits. (Elective)

This course will focus on concepts of spirituality in health care and in OT practice. Students will also be exposed to literature from occupational therapy, nursing, medicine, theology, social work and psychology. Methods of assessing spiritual strengths and needs will be covered as well as methods to consider spirituality to be about a person's relationship with his/her inner self, with other people, and with the transcendent. Students will compare and contrast the concepts of spirituality and religion. As part of the course, students will actively explore their own spirituality and religion. As part of the course, students will actively explore their own spirituality and religion. As part of the course, students will actively explore their own spiritual journey. Classes will consist of small group discussions, panel presentation, and student directed learning.

POTD 500. Introduction to Clinical Doctoral Studies. 2 credits.

This course provides foundational information and skills for engaging in the post professional distance OTD program. Emphasis is on understanding the expectations and purpose of professional doctoral education, developing proficiency with computer hardware, software, and programs, demonstrating basic literature search strategies, developing professional writing skills, developing a plan of study, and building a learning community.

POTD 501. Historical Perspectives of Occupation. 3 credits.

This course traces the evolution of the profession's view of the occupational nature of the human being and how human beings realize their sense of life's meaning through purposeful activity. Through this historical review, students critically evaluate the profession's premises and deepen their understanding of how fundamental beliefs drove the profession in the past, inform present practice, and propel future transformation of occupational therapy. Using methods of historical inquiry, students relate historical paradigm shifts within the profession to contextual changes in society and articulate implications for the practice of occupational therapy. P: Enrollment in post professional program.

POTD 502. Physical Agent Modalities, Theory and Application in Occupational Therapy. 3 credits. (Elective)

Physical agent modalities are adjunctive methods used by occupational therapy practitioners to produce a biophysiological response in tissue through the use of light, water, temperature, sound, electricity, or mechanical devices. This course provides the theoretical basis for selecting and safely utilizing appropriate physical agents in occupational therapy practice. Students will apply clinical reasoning to select and apply appropriate modalities for neurological, orthopedic, and degenerative disease processes across the lifespan. AOTA position paper, evidenced based practice, licensure requirements and liability and competency issues, safety precautions, and indications and contraindications will be discussed P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 511. Neuro-Occupation. 3 credits.

This course braids occupation with neuroscience and provides an overview of philosophy and theories of the mind, systems theory, nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complexity theory as the foundation of understanding neuroscience and occupation as they inter-relate. pertinent neuroscience systems are covered with an emphasis placed on examination of neurology as a system of support underlying occupation, occupational patterns, and the occupational nature of humans. P: Enrollment in Post Professional OTD program POTD.

POTD 514. Occupation and Health Population Perspectives. 3 credits.

This course will examine the role of occupation in enhancing the health of populations through health promotion, health education and prevention of illness. Key concepts of population health, needs assessment, health promotion and health behavior will be applied to develop local and global population-based approaches through service-learning for meeting health needs of individuals and communities. P: IC.

POTD 516. Health Program Management. 3 credits.

This course will focus on comprehensive program planning, program development, financial management, quality management, program evaluation and marketing in the context of grant writing, private practice and health systems management. Emphasis will be placed on the development of business strategies for survival and success of occupational therapy based programs. P: Admission to the post professional OTD program.

POTD 517. Health Care Policy. 3 credits.

This course involves the study of health care/disability policies and their effects on occupational therapy practice. This course includes the examination of government and regulatory systems, professional societies, economic, political, and professional forces, and cultural and social values which influence the development of health care policy and contemporary practice. Students examine and apply advocacy skills.

POTD 518. Leadership Development. 3 credits.

This course will provide students with concepts, techniques and tools to assist in their leadership development. Leadership paradigms, models and strategies will be evaluated with an emphasis on influencing organizational and societal change. Students will identify, formulate and apply personal and professional attributes and behaviors to develop themselves as leaders of organizations and which are necessary for effective leadership. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 521. Occupation in Community. 3 credits.

This course incorporates interdisciplinary and occupational literature to investigate the interrelationship of occupation, community, and meaning construction in the context of illness, disability, and wellness. Building on an individual's subjective occupational experience, students will analyze notions of meaning, occupational patterns, occupational choices, and participation in community as they occur in relationship to others in a variety of contexts. P: Enrollment in post-professional program.

POTD 530. Grant Writing and Occupational Therapy Practice: Making the Connection. 3 credits. (Elective)

In this course, students will explore the practice of grant writing as it relates to occupational therapy practice. Students will learn grant writing terminology and the technique of grant writing; best practices for searching and find a request for proposals that matches with their grant ideas; how to construct all the portions required for a grant application including the grant narrative, budget, and evaluation plan; and plan for the sustainability of a project beyond the grant funding period. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 531. The American Professoriate: A Faculty Perspective. 3 credits. (Elective)

This course will examine contemporary faculty issues in postsecondary institutions from the perspective of a faculty member. The course includes an assessment of the current status of faculty in the United States, faculty workloads, performance reviews, and structuring professional development activities and special topics. Toward this end, the professoriate will be explored to include: (1) current conditions of the professoriate, (2) academic careers and the stages of an academic, (3) faculty culture, including academic freedom and tenure, (4) faculty work, (5) occupational therapy faculty, and (6) special topics selected on the basis of the students' need and interest assessment. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 532. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Treatments with Traditional Practice. 3 credits. (Elective)

As complementary and alternative treatments (CAM) gain acceptance in the clinical community, occupational therapists are uniquely qualified to incorporate many into our practice as part of a comprehensive approach to enhance engagement in occupation. Students will explore how CAMs can be used in Occupational Therapy practice as preparatory activities, therapeutic exercise or as meaningful occupations. Some of the CAM techniques explored include guided imagery, myofascial release, therapeutic touch, acupressure, meditation, yoga, tai chi and progressive relaxation training. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 533. Emerging Topics in Advanced Geriatric Practice. 3 credits. (Elective)

This course will look at several of the emerging practice areas that focus on geriatric practice suggested by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) (Johansson, 2000). These geriatric practices areas include driver rehabilitation and training, design and accessibility consulting and home modification, low vision services, and health and wellness consulting (balance and fall prevention, memory support) (Johansson, 2000). From a self selected area of interest students will research and study in depth the topic followed by designing a program prototype based on best practice. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 534. Holistic Stress Management. 3 credits. (Elective)

This course is designed to bring increased recognition and validation to the importance of a holistic approach to stress management in occupational therapy practice. Students will explore topics including the effects of stress on the body, creativity and healing, humor, guided imagery, relaxation, visual arts and music, journaling, and meditation. Students will learn to apply the concepts and techniques in occupational therapy practice as well as in their own lives. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 535. Infant Mental Health in Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 credits. (Elective)

This course explores key concepts and research of infant and early childhood mental health including definitions of infant mental health including definitions of infant mental health attachment, temperament, and risk and resiliency in infant and family relationships. Students will apply these principles along with an understanding of occupation, child development and family systems to analyze the role of an occupational therapist in best practice infant mental assessment and intervention as part of an interdisciplinary team.

POTD 536. Current Topics in Pediatric Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 credits. (Elective)

changes have occurred, and are occurring, in this practice area such as sensory integration theory to incorporate sensory processing disorder, children and youth with autism, and changes in Individuals with Education Improvement Act (including Response to Intervention). In recent years there has been increased emphasis on addressing social skills, transition services for young adults, and occupation centered intervention. Finally, there has been an increase in new standardized and criterion referenced screening and assessment tools. This course will explore these topics and additional topics as identified by the students in the course. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 537. Critical Perspectives of Disability and Society. 3 credits. (Elective)

The experience of disability is usually viewed as a condition of personal deficit, misfortune, and shame. In this course we will question these negative perceptions, as well as the practices and discourses through which they are generated and reinforced. This course will introduce students to a critical framework for recognizing entrenched attitudes, barriers, and representations that tend to have stigmatizing and discriminatory effects on people identified as disabled. We will study the work of scholars and activists who have reinterpreted disability as a form of human variation. We will also explore various models of disability and the history of development of disability as a concept in multiple levels of human society. Finally, students will be introduced to narrative methods used to investigate the personal experience of disability. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 538. Occupational Therapy Pharmacotherapeutics. 3 credits. (Elective)

Students will be taught to utilize the knowledge of physiology and neuroanatomy to develop an understanding of effects of medication on human performance throughout the life span within the context of various physical and mental dysfunctions. The class is designed to help students develop an understanding of substance abuse, drug interactions, drug compliance, age and dosage recommendations of various classes of drugs.

POTD 539. Rehabilitation and Neuro-technology. 3 credits. (Elective)

This course focuses on neuro-technologies which produce a new or altered neurobehavioral or neuromuscular response. Neuro-technologies are used to restore or alter sensory perceptions, motor control (balance, coordination, rigidity, tone), mood, or to relieve pain. Case studies will be used to integrate the application of neuro-technologies. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 541. Critical Analysis of Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 credits.

This course explores key perspectives of critical theory. Students will gain an understanding of external and internal criticisms of the profession of occupational therapy. Through student-driven learning activities, the course will emphasize the judicious use of evidence-based methods in assessment and treatment in order to contribute to the ongoing refinement of the profession. P:OTD 501 and OTD 553.

POTD 553. Introduction to Inquiry. 2 credits.

This course is the first of a series of research courses. Emphasis of this course will be placed on developing critical research consumers and building a solid foundation in research. This course will examine evidence-based practice, explore the relationship among theory, research and practice and gain an understanding of the research process. Both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies will be introduced and students will begin to understand numerous research designs. Critical knowledge and skills in research will be highlighted. Research literature in occupational therapy will be critically examined.

POTD 554. Research Proposal. 2 credits.

The focus of this course is the development of a methodologically sound and IRB approved research proposal. Students will identify a research problem, formulate researchable questions; select a research design, quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods; that is best suited to answer the research questions. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods data analysis will be discussed and students will apply such knowledge and skills in developing research proposals. The IRB process will be reviewed and implemented for developed research proposals. Through proposal development, students will gain competence in scientific inquiry. P: POTD 553.

POTD 555. Research Implementation. 1.5 credit.

This course is a continuation of the POTD Research Proposal course. The research proposals developed in the Research Proposal course will be implemented in this course. Emphasis is placed on the first hand experience of the research process (recruitment of participants, data collection and analysis, etc.) Students will collect all necessary data and analyze data during this course. Students will critically analyze and solve problems encountered during the proposal implementation process, which will be closely monitored by the course instructor to ensure research integrity. P: POTD 554.

POTD 556. Manuscript Writing. 1.5 credit.

This course is a continuation of POTD 555, Research Implementation. A scholarly written research manuscript is expected of students at the end of this course. P: POTD 555.

POTD 562. Advanced Clinical Ethics. 3 credits.

This course focuses on ethical reflection, negotiation, and decision-making in Occupational Therapy. Theoretical frameworks, concepts, and applied analytical strategies are examined critically in light of their usefulness for practice. An emphasis is placed on the acquisition of skills necessary to take ethics-related service and leadership roles in health care institutions, communities, professional associations and regulatory review boards.

POTD 565. Instructional Methods and Evaluation. 3 credits.

Philosophical foundations of knowledge and learning and their relationship with occupational therapy theoretical principles are examined. Major approaches to teaching are discussed and implications for occupational therapy practice are sought. Close attention is paid to the educative role occupational therapists may plan in a variety of settings including clinics, hospitals, community agencies, and colleges and universities. Other major content areas of this course include instructional design, methods, skills, and media; evaluation; and education and supervision of students during experiential activities. P: Full-time standing in third year of entry-level program or enrollment in post professional program.

POTD 580. Professional Trajectory. 1 credit.

Students use their understanding of occupation, professional practice, and professional identity and leadership from didactic and clinical experiences to develop learning objectives which will be carried out during the Professional Rotation course. The emphasis of this course is on self directed personal and professional exploration and development. P: Enrollment to the post professional OTD program.

POTD 590. Doctoral Experiential Component. 1-16 credits.

Students construct this professional experience by carrying out their personal learning objectives identified in POTD 580 Professional Trajectory. Course objectives move from personal and professional transformation toward the transformation of practice. A total of 16 credit hours of Post Professional Rotation coursework is required for graduation. Number of credit hours assigned to each experience is based on learning objectives and approval of instructor. P: OTD 580.

POTD 599. Directed Independent Studies. 1-6 credits.

This course is an opportunity for motivated occupational therapy students to become involved in a course of study under the direction and guidance of faculty in order to: a) pursue, in depth, an area covered more generally in curriculum; b) explore a topic not normally covered in the curriculum; c) provide occupational therapy services to diverse and underserved populations, or d)assist with or conduct research in an occupational therapy area of practice. In all cases, it is the student's responsibility to fully identify the topic, acquire enough information to ensure its worthiness for independent study and negotiate for several offerings of this course. P: Enrollment in post professional OTD program.

POTD 601. Capstone. 1 credit.

The focus of this course is to reflect on student learning and achievement of program goals. Students will identify dimensions of the program that promoted self growth and transformed their practice. Students will negotiate a culminating professional project that disseminates knowledge (e.g. research, critically appraised topic, program development or professional rotation work).

Faculty

Professors: Shirley A. Blanchard, Alfred G. Bracciano, Brenda M. Coppard, Helene Lohman, Keli Mu, Linda S. Scheirton

Associate Professors: Joy D. Doll, Kathleen Flecky

Assistant Professors: Lisa D. Bagby, Angela Bahle-Lampe, Michelle De la Garza, Anna Domina, Bobbi Greiner, Lou Jensen, Vanessa Jewell, Amy Mayer, Angela Patterson, Kristina Peterkin, Andrea Thinnes, Jacy Vermaas-Lee

Instructors: Marisa R. Sevick, Julia Ye-Jin Shin

Special Associate Professor: Rene Padilla

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Lori Davis-Russel

Adjunct Instructors: Lisa Jordan, Molly A. McCarthy, Janel Meis

: Diane Jorgensen