Interim Program Director: Patrick Swanson, PhD

http://medschool.creighton.edu/medicine/departments/biomedicalsciences/index.php

Graduate Study in Biomedical Sciences

The Department of Biomedical Sciences offers programs of study culminating in the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees. Completion of the programs prepares individuals for research careers in academia, institutes, or industry. The programs are flexible and employ a multi-disciplinary approach using our research, courses, and facilities to cater to the career needs and research interests of the individual student, in diverse areas of study in:

Biochemistry and Bioorganic Chemistry
Bone Biology
Cancer Biology
Cell and Developmental Biology
Molecular Biology and Gene Regulation
Neurobiology and Neurodegenerative Diseases
Physiology
Pulmonary and Vascular Biology
Hearing and Hearing Disorders

The Department encourages collaborative research interaction with faculty in the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Medicine, Pharmacology, Physics, Surgery, the Osteoporosis Research Center, the Boys Town National Research Hospital, and the Veteran’s Administration Hospital.

Students are trained mainly through participation in research, thus emphasis is given to placement of students in research laboratories early in their program. A faculty advisory committee will determine the elective courses most appropriate and that best meet the individual's training.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Biomedical Sciences graduate programs is to provide excellent academic programs that educate and train the next generation of scientists, educators, and health-related professionals through scholarship and research that fosters creativity, discovery, and community service.

Program Goals

At the completion of this graduate program in Biomedical Sciences, students will:

  1. Demonstrate advanced knowledge in molecular and cellular biology and in their field of specialization.
  2. Demonstrate independent critical and analytical thinking, both within their field of study and beyond, for use in the service to others.
  3. Identify and suggest possible solutions to ethical dilemmas that occur in their work and field of study, and understand the importance of professional ethics in all aspects of scientific communication and laboratory work.
  4. Demonstrate competence in the laboratory, including application of the scientific method and appropriate use of basic and state of the art laboratory tools and techniques.
  5. Demonstrate written and oral skills necessary for communication of research, knowledge, and ideas to scientists and non-scientists.

Admission Requirements

  1. A bachelor’s degree or equivalent, preferably with satisfactory completion of course work in a biological, chemical or physical science.
  2. A GPA of 3.0 overall.
  3. GRE scores in the 50th percentile or above for the verbal and quantitative parts of the examination.
  4. The Graduate School requires all students from countries in which English is not the native language to demonstrate competence in English. A minimal score of 90 on the Internet-based Test (iBT) at the graduate level is required for this program.

The deadline for applications to the doctoral program is January 15th for admission in the fall semester. The deadline for applications to the masters program is May 1 for admission in the fall semester.

Biomedical Sciences Degree Programs

Courses

BMS 503. Microscopic Anatomy. 4 credits.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the light microscopic anatomy and ultrastructure of cells, tissues, and organs. A combination of lectures, discussions, and laboratories is employed with a major focus on a laboratory experience using the light microscope. P: IC.

BMS 511. Medical Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics. 3 credits. FA

This course covers functional aspects of eukaryotic cells including gene regulation/expression, signal transduction, and cell-cell interactions. The course will be geared towards answering specific biological questions ranging from detailed analysis of a single gene through whole-genome analysis, transcriptional profiling, and functional genomics. P: IC.

BMS 521. Principles of Biochemistry. 4 credits. SP

This course examines the fundamental principles of structural biochemistry, enzymology, metabolism and molecular biology. P: CHM 323 or Gr. Stdg. only with IC.

BMS 601. Human Physiology. 4 credits. SP

This course examines basic concepts of cellular physiology and organ system physiology of the nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and renal systems, as well as multisystem integration. P: Gr. Stdg. or IC.

BMS 602. Human Gross Anatomy. 6 credits. FA (Same as CAN 602)

Detailed structure of the human body. Dissection of the cadaver combined with conferences, lectures, and assigned readings. P: IC.

BMS 603. Microscopic Anatomy. 4 credits. FA

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the light microscopic anatomy and ultrastructure of cells, tissues, and organs. A combination of lectures, discussions, and laboratories is employed with a major focus on a laboratory experience using the light microscope. P: Gr. stdg. or IC.

BMS 604. Fundamentals Of Cell And Molecular Biology. 6 credits. FA

This course consists of lectures on the functional aspects of cell and molecular biology with an emphasis on eukaryotic cells. P: IC.

BMS 605. Fundamentals of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Pathology. 2 credits. FA

This course is an introduction to fundamentals in patterns of inheritance, genetic diseases, cytogenetics, cell injury, and neoplasia. Topics will include Mendelian genetics and genetic diseases, cytogenomics, use of online genomic databases, wound healing, and molecular basis of neoplasia as well as basic principles of pathology. P: Gr. Stdg. or IC.

BMS 606. Proteins: Structure-Function Relationships. 4 credits. SP

Topics covered include primary structure, principles of secondary and tertiary structures, enzyme kinetics, chemical modifications and their effects, protein-protein interactions, protein complementation and prediction of conformation. Presentation and model building by students are integral parts of this course. P: Gr. Stdg. or IC.

BMS 610. Bone Biology Fundamentals. 3 credits. AY, SP

This course examines fundamental aspects of skeletal biology, including the microscopic anatomy and ultrastructure of bone, morphogenesis and embryologic development of the skeletal system, bone modeling and remodeling, biomechanics of bone, skeletal physiology, mineral homeostasis, and clinical evaluation of bone and mineral disorders. P: IC.

BMS 611. Medical Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics. 3 credits. FA

This course covers functional aspects of eukaryotic cells including gene regulation/expression, signal transduction, and cell-cell interactions. The course will be geared towards answering specific biological questions ranging from detailed analysis of a single gene through whole-genome analysis, transcriptional profiling, and functional genomics. P: IC.

BMS 621. Teaching Practicum In Gross Anatomy. 1-3 credits. FA

This course provides practical experience in teaching human gross anatomy. P: IC.

BMS 624. Human Neuroanatomy. 4 credits. SP

This course covers fundamental concepts in neuroscience, including functional neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuroembryology.

BMS 630. Fundamentals of Hearing. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This is an advanced graduate level course focusing on the anatomy and physiology of the auditory system. The course will introduce students to the basics of normal human hearing with a focus on the peripheral auditory system, neural coding of sound, and the perception of simple sounds. P: Gr. Stdg. or IC.

BMS 667. Developmental Biology. 3 credits. FA

This course covers cellular and molecular events underlying animal development and cell differentiation in vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics will include the early body plan, cell determination and diversity, organogenesis, morphogenesis, and stem cells, and includes vertebrate (mouse, chick, frog, fish, human) and invertebrate (fly, worm) models. P: Gr. Stdg. or IC.

BMS 705. Advanced Neuroscience. 3 credits. AY, FA

This course consists of detailed examination of the physiology, cell biology, and molecular biology of the nervous system, with emphasis on mammalian systems. The course will include membrane physiology, ion channels, synaptic physiology, neurotransmitters and receptors, sensory receptors, neural circuits, and advanced techniques. P: IC.

BMS 706. Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology. 4 credits.

Detailed consideration of the functional aspects of cell and molecular biology with emphasis on eukaryotic cells. Topics include structure, and synthesis of DNA and RNA, gene expression regulation, signal transduction, transport and processing of secretory proteins, and relevance of these topics in eukaryotic differentiation and pathologies such as cancer.

BMS 720. Advanced Topics in Molecular Structure/Function. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course covers functional aspects of molecular structure, peptide chemistry, and molecular interactions. Topics vary will change with each iteration of the course permitting students to repeatedly enroll in the course but with each covering a different topic. Nine credit hours are the maximal applicable toward the degree. P: IC.

BMS 730. Advanced Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course covers functional aspects of eukaryotic cells including gene regulation/expression, signal transduction, and cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. Topics vary will change with each iteration of the course permitting students to repeatedly enroll in the course but with each covering a different topic. Nine credit hours are the maximal applicable toward the degree. P: IC.

BMS 740. Advanced Topics in Physiology. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course covers specific aspects of physiology and pathophysiology of whole organisms and organ systems as well as cellular physiology. Topics vary will change with each iteration of the course permitting students to repeatedly enroll in the course but with each covering a different topic. Nine credit hours are the maximal applicable toward the degree. P: IC.

BMS 747. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Transmembrane Signaling. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

Detailed analysis of how an external signal is transduced into a cell language resulting in a response. Intracellular pathways involved in signal transduction will be examined. Discussions on various cell proteins and cross-talk among intracellular signal transduction pathways. P: IC.

BMS 750. Advanced Topics in Morphology and Anatomy. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course covers functional morphology ranging from cellular ultrastructure to gross anatomy and embryology. Topics vary will change with each iteration of the course permitting students to repeatedly enroll in the course but with each covering a different topic. Nine credit hours are the maximal applicable toward the degree. P: IC.

BMS 760. Advance Topics in Neuroscience. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course integrates the areas of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, and neuropathology at the cellular and organismal level. Topics vary with each iteration of the course permitting students to repeatedly enroll for the course but with each covering a different topic. Nine credit hours are the maximum applicable toward the degree. P: IC.

BMS 790. Research Methods. 3-5 credits. FA, SP

This course consists of methods and techniques used in on-going research projects. P: IC.

BMS 791. Seminar. 1 credit. FA, SP

This course consists of formal oral presentations and critical discussions of assigned subjects to familiarize students with the nature and extent of research literature, the analysis of research papers, and the collation and presentation of scientific information. This course is repeatable. P:IC.

BMS 792. Journal Club. 1 credit. FA, SP, SU

This course consists of detailed examination of the physiology, cell biology, and molecular biology of the nervous system, with emphasis on mammalian systems. The course will include membrane physiology, ion channels, synaptic physiology, neurotransmitters and receptors, sensory receptors, neural circuits, and advanced techniques. P: IC.

BMS 795. Directed Independent Study. 2 credits. FA, SP, SU

Each student, supervised by faculty members, will pursue in-depth reading and discussions on current research topics of interest to faculty and students. The purpose is to provide an environment whereby the student is introduced to scientific research methods and can improve critical thinking and reading skills as well as exchanging scientific information. P: IC.

BMS 797. Directed Independent Research. 3-6 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course consists of original investigation under supervision and guidance of individual staff members. P: IC.

BMS 799. Master's Thesis. 1-3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course consists of review of the literature and research data; writing of the thesis. Students must register for this course in any term when engaged in formal preparation of the Master's thesis; however, six credit hours are the maximum applicable toward the degree. P: IC.

BMS 899. Doctoral Dissertation. 3-6 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course consists of review of the literature and research data and the writing of the dissertation. Students must register for this course in any term when engaged in formal preparation of the doctoral dissertation; however, twenty credit hours are the maximum applicable toward the degree. P: IC.