Management

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Management as the field of concentration, this program is designed for those students who have a very strong interest in business, but whose desire for specialization lies outside the traditional majors of accounting, economics, finance, international business, marketing, or business intelligence and analytics. Students majoring in management can choose from any of seven tracks:

  • Bioscience Entrepreneurship
  • Business Ethics
  • General Entrepreneurship
  • Human Resource Management
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Military Management (ROTC students only)
  • 4-Year Pre-Law

Marketing

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with Marketing as the field of concentration, this program is designed for students interested in general careers in marketing management and/or specific jobs in sales, service, retailing, advertising, marketing research, or customer analytics. The major consists of nine credit hours that examine core elements of marketing management and nine credit hours tailored to a student’s particular interests. Students may choose a specialization within marketing, but are not required to do so. They may only specialize in one area within marketing. No more than six credit hours may be counted toward both a marketing major and any other major or track within the business school. Substitutions for marketing electives may be made only with the approval of the Department Chair. Students considering marketing as a major are advised to take MKT 319 Principles of Marketing before the fall semester of their junior year.

Minors in  Marketing and Management

Courses

BUS 101. Dean's Fellows Foundational Sequence. 0 credits.

Deans Fellows course. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P:Deans Fellow; IC.

BUS 103. Business Research Fellows Foundational Sequence. 0 credits.

P: Deans Fellow; IC.

BUS 201. Legal Environment of Business. 3 credits. FA, SP

Focuses on laws that affect managerial action. Introduction to the traditional sources of law, the U.S. Constitution and its Amendments; the basic characteristics of the U.S. legal system, the law of contracts, torts, and property, and understanding of the various business entitlements, their creation, operation, and termination; a basic understanding of the administrative agency process, antitrust, employer-employee relations, laws against discrimination, consumer protection, environmental laws, and the myriad of other laws that affect business action and changing public policy regarding law. P: So. stdg.

BUS 229. Statistical Analysis. 4 credits. FA, SP, SU

Use of descriptive and inferential statistical methods in the analysis of business and economic data. Topics include probability distributions, confidence intervals, tests of hypothesis, multiple regression and correlation, time series analysis and index numbers, and decision analysis. P: MTH 141 or MTH 245; MTH 201.

BUS 266. Business Externship. 1 credit. FA, SP, SU

This course is designed to give academic credit to students acquiring practical knowledge by working in business prior to qualifying for the junior-level 366 internship-for-credit. Students should work a minimum of 50 hours. This course counts toward non-restricted elective credit only; it cannot be used for business elective or major elective credit. The course is not available to those students who have completed a 366 course in the Heider College. The class may be repeated up to 4 times only. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. P: Soph. stdg. and IC.

BUS 301. Business Law. 3 credits. FA, SP

Detailed analysis of specific areas of law that most impact the operation and management of business enterprises. Course serves as an introduction to the study of law as a discipline and as a preparation for those students planning to sit for the CPA examination. P: BUS 201; Jr. stdg.

BUS 321. Mock Trial Lecture. 2 credits. FA

Exploration and analysis of the presentation of a Mock Trial. Course content changes from year to year. In even-numbered years, the cases presented are civil cases. In odd-numbered years, the cases presented are criminal cases. Some travel required. This course cannot be repeated.

BUS 322. Mock Trial Practicum. 1 credit. SP

Limited to students who want to develop a more in-depth knowledge of Mock Trial beyond the first course. Some travel required. P: BUS 321 or IC.

BUS 356. Business Ethics. 3 credits. FA, SP

Study of the principles and practice of good moral behavior by the business community. Lectures are supplemented by case discussion, community service, and other experiential activities that directly involve students in ethical and socially responsible behavior. P: PHL 250 or PHL 270 or PHL 272; Jr. stdg.

BUS 366. Business Internships. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course is designed to give credit to students for major-related significant practical business experience. The internship should allow the students to apply concepts and technical skills learned in the classroom to a real work setting. Students must work 150 hours during a semester; write a final paper describing the learning value of their internship; and participate in an end-of-semester synthesis session. The student's internship employment must be secured before registering for the class. The course is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis and only 3 hours of internship credit may be used to satisfy graduation requirements. P: Second semester Jr. or higher standing in the Heider College of Business.

BUS 401. Legal Aspects of Life Insurance. 3 credits.

This class will focus on understanding of the legal aspects of Individual Life Insurance as a financial services contract and a key cornerstone of the financial planning and risk management processes. This course will cover concepts relating to the key contractual elements of life insurance and policy provisions. Covers life insurance contractual obligations relating to the company, as well as policy assignment and estate issues relating to beneficiary designations. Concludes with legal aspects of Agents/Brokers, marketing and advertising, illustration regulations and privacy laws. This course covers the materials required for educational credit towards the CLU professional designation. P: ECO 203, FIN 513, Jr. Stdg., elementary level skills in Microsoft Office Suite.

BUS 471. Strategic Management. 3 credits. FA, SP

Strategic Management is a discipline that studies the variability of performance across organizations. Students will be exposed to the theories and models of both Competitive Strategy and Corporate Strategy. The course utilizes the case method of teaching to expose students to historical business scenarios that highlight the complexity of strategic decision making across multiple industries and countries. Class discussion, writing assignments, and presentations are used to promote critical thinking in the analysis of case details and the application of theoretical frameworks. As the capstone of the BSBA degree, the course requires students to apply all their acquired disciplinary knowledge in conjunction with the theories of strategic management to craft strategies that create sustained competitive advantage for organizations. P: Heider College of Business Sr. stdg; FIN 301, MGT 301, MKT 319.

BUS 479. Seminar in Business. 1-3 credits. FA, SP

Exploration and analysis of selected problems, topics, and issues in today's business environment. Course content changes from semester to semester. This course is repeatable as long as topic differs (12 credits). P: Jr. stdg.

BUS 491. The Business World: A Campus and Travel Course. 3 credits.

This course is designed to provide a capstone travel experience in which students make on-site visits to a variety of organizations known for their business leadership and innovative practice. The overall aim is to complement a student's campus-based study of business concepts, processes, activities, and organizations. The course typically includes approximately 15 hours of on-campus study prior to and after the travel portion of the course. The travel portion of the course may involve various destinations. Note: A student in the Heider College of Business may only count up to six credit hours of travel courses toward their 128 credit hour program of study. P: Instructor consent.

BUS 492. The Business World: An International Travel Course. 3 credits.

This international travel course is designed to provide an opportunity to explore business practices and culture in a foreign country. The overall aim is to complement a student’s campus-based study of business concepts, processes, activities, and organizations. The course typically includes on campus meetings prior to and after the travel portion of the course. The travel portion of the course involves one to two weeks of travel for on-site visits to a variety of local destinations that represent the country’s business practices and culture. Note: A student in the Heider College of Business may only count up to six credit hours of travel courses toward their 128 credit hour program of study. P: Instructor Consent.

BUS 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits. OD

Limited to students who want to develop a more in-depth knowledge of a subject beyond the regular course coverage and who have a QPA of 3.0 or better. Sr. stdg.; DC & Dean's approval. May be repeated for credit to a limit of six hours.

BUS 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-3 credits. OD

Supervised independent research on topics beyond the regular course coverage. Course is limited to students who have a QPA of 3.0 or better. P: Sr. stdg; DC and Dean's approval.

ENT 311. Innovation and Creativity. 3 credits. FA, SP

An outcome-based course in which participants learn to recognize, analyze, and support the key determinants of individual and group creativity and innovation within a social venture context. Social innovation refers to new strategies, concepts, ideas and organizations that meet social needs of all kinds—from working conditions and education to community development and health—and that extend and strengthen civil society. By examining theoretical models and contemporary articles and cases on innovation within a social entrepreneurship framework, the course seeks to help students develop creative business options for organizing and implementing solutions to difficult problems facing the world. This course begins the social and general entrepreneurship major and concentration sequence. P: Completion of at least 45 hours of college credit.

ENT 366. Entrepreneurship Internship. 3 credits. FA, SP

This course is designed to give credit to students for major-related significant practical experience working in entrepreneurial businesses or nonprofits. The internship should allow the students to apply concepts and technical skills learned in the classroom to a real work setting. Students must work 150 hours during a semester; write a final paper describing the learning value of their internships; and participate in an end-of-semester synthesis session. The student's internship employment must be secured before registering for the class. The course is graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory and only 3 hours of internship credit may be used to satisfy graduation requirements. P: ENT 311 or ENT 418; Second semester Jr. or higher standing in the Heider College of Business only; IC.

ENT 411. Finance for Entrepreneurial Ventures. 3 credits. FA, SP

This course is designed to provide students with an exposure to financial concepts in entrepreneurship from both a theoretical and managerial perspective. It is available to graduate students as well as undergraduate students majoring or minoring in social, bioscience, or general entrepreneurship. In the course, students will be introduced to the differences between cash budgeting and financial accounting and will learn to read and interpret financial statements, understand different methods of valuing a start-up company, and be trained to identify a variety of funding mechanisms that are relevant to financing startup and growth, including grants, debt, and equity. Differences in technology and not-for-profit from more traditional businesses will also be explored. P: ECO 203.

ENT 418. Bioscience Technology Commercialization. 3 credits. FA

This course is the first in a two course sequence designed to educate upper level undergraduate and graduate students in law, science, health science and business about commercializing technology in the biosciences. As such, it focuses on working in interdisciplinary teams to understand the invention and research process, public policy issues, market and demographic trends, commercialization channels, intellectual property protection, organizing to produce bioscience products, FDA and other regulation, insurance reimbursement policies, venture financing, and other topics relevant to this process. P: ENT 411.

ENT 451. Vocation of the Business Leader. 3 credits. OD

What does it mean to embrace the role of a business leader as a vocation? This course examines the answer to that question at length and in depth. Questions examined include: How should leaders lead and communicate for organizations in which social mission is a fundamental component? How should we view acquisition and execution of power where one's leadership role is embraced as vocation? What principles and values guide a company where business is positioned as a source of hope? What questions should leaders ask themselves to better understand the extent to which their organization is truly contributing to the common good? How can we use these principles to evaluate current organizations positioned on faith and social responsibility to assess the true effectiveness of their contribution to the common good of society? P: Senior standing.

ENT 473. Venture Creation and Development. 3 credits. SP

An experiential course on venture creation and entrepreneurship in which participants learn the following tools: opportunity/idea modeling, strategic pivoting, dynamic landscaping, tribe organizational structures, and pitch development. These cutting edge tools build the framework for robust and innovative entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial ventures for any ecosystem. This course caps all entrepreneurship major and minor concentration sequences. P: ENT 311 or ENT 418; ENT 411; MKT 319; Senior standing.

ENT 475. Entrepreneurship Incubator. 3 credits. OD

This course allows students who have completed ENT 473 (Venture Creation and Development) to implement the plans devised in either ENT 473 or working in conjunction with a local social business venture, either for-profit or not-for-profit. Students develop an organization or will work with an existing organization to deliver the products or services spelled out in their plan. Students taking this course will be required to obtain any funding that is required to carry out their proposed projects. P: ENT 473; IC.

ENT 479. Seminar in Entrepreneurship. 3 credits. FA, SP

Exploration and analysis of selected problems, topics and issues in today's entrepreneurial environment. Course content changes from semester to semester. This course is repeatable as long as topic differs.

ENT 491. The Entrepreneurship World: A Campus and Travel Course. 3 credits.

This course is designed to provide a capstone travel experience in which students make on-site visits to a variety of organizations known for their business leadership and innovative practice in the field of entrepreneurship. The overall aim is to complement a student's campus-based study of entrepreneurship concepts, processes, and activities - as well as exemplar organizations. The course typically includes approximately 15 hours of on-campus study prior to and after the travel portion of the course. The travel portion of the course may involve various destinations. Note: A student in the Heider College of Business may only count up to six credit hours of travel toward their 128 credit hour program of study. P: Instructor approval.

ENT 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-3 credits. FA, SP

Supervised independent research on topics beyond the regular course coverage. Course is limited to students who have a GPA of 3.0 or better. May be repeated for credit to a limit of six hours. P: Senior standing; Department Consent and Dean's approval.

ENT 511. Finance for Entrepreneurial Ventures. 3 credits. FA, SP

Available to graduate and undergraduate students, this course is designed to provide students with an exposure to financial concepts in entrepreneurship from both a theoretical and managerial perspective. (Students taking the course for graduate credit are typically required to complete additional work beyond the requirements for undergraduate credit.) In the course, students will be introduced to the differences between cash budgeting and financial accounting and will learn to read and interpret financial statements, understand different methods of valuing a start-up company, and be trained to identify a variety of funding mechanisms that are relevant to financing startup and growth, including grants, debt, and equity. Differences in technology and not-for-profit from more traditional businesses will also be explored. P:IC.

ENT 518. Bioscience Technology Commercialization. 3 credits. FA

Available to graduate and undergraduate students, this course is the first in a two-course sequence designed to educate students in law, science, health science and business about commercializing technology in the biosciences. (Students taking the course for graduate credit are typically required to complete additional work beyond the requirements for undergraduate credit.) As such, it focuses on working in interdisciplinary teams to understand the invention and research process, public policy issues, market and demographic trends, commercialization channels, intellectual property protection, organizing to produce bioscience products, FDA and other regulation, insurance reimbursement policies, venture financing, and other topics relevant to this process. P: IC.

ENT 551. Sustainable Enterprise and Social Entrepreneurship. 3 credits. OD

The pervasiveness of business claims about being “green” and increased societal expectations for businesses to be “responsible” have brought sustainability into the mainstream. Companies desiring competitive advantage and leadership have embraced sustainability as an integral component of their strategy. At the same time, recognizing the capabilities of business, “social entrepreneurs” are moving to address problems previously assumed to be the responsibility of governments. Available to graduate and undergraduate students, this course will examine what it means to be “sustainable” and what strategies corporations employ in support of their sustainability mission. (Students taking the course for graduate credit are typically required to complete additional work beyond the requirements for undergraduate credit.) Additionally, the course will explore corporations’ efforts to expand their markets to include the “base of the pyramid” as well as examples of social entrepreneurship ventures which aim to promote social welfare. P: Jr. Standing and Heider College of Business students, or IC.

ENT 555. Renewable Energy Strategy. 3 credits. OD

Over the last decade, investment in renewable energy technologies and business ventures has increased markedly; spurred on mostly by rising energy costs and concerns regarding future carbon regulations. Available to graduate and undergraduate students, this course is designed to provide future managers with the skills to apply the tools of strategic management to the unique business challenges of the growing renewable energy sector. (Students taking the course for graduate credit are typically required to complete additional work beyond the requirements for undergraduate credit.) The case based teaching method will be utilized in the course. By examining real world examples of firms engaged in renewable energy business models, students will learn to identify where strategic management tools remain relevant and where these additional factors require an adaptation of traditional strategic thinking. P: Jr. standing and Heider College of Business students, or IC.

ENT 573. Venture Creation and Development. 3 credits. SP

Available to graduate and undergraduate students, this is an experiential course on venture creation and entrepreneurship in which participants learn the following tools: opportunity/idea modeling, strategic pivoting, dynamic landscaping, tribe organizational structures, and pitch development. (Students taking the course for graduate credit are typically required to complete additional work beyond the requirements for undergraduate credit.) These cutting edge tools build the framework for robust and innovative entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial ventures for any ecosystem. P: ENT 518; IC.

MGT 301. Managerial Process And Organizational Behavior. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

Introduces the principal duties of managers in modern organizations and the processes they use to promote employee satisfaction and performance. Students will explore the topics addressing the management of individuals, the management of teams and groups, and the management of organizations. Specific topics may include the study of leadership philosophies, organizational structure and design, managerial decision-making, employee motivation, managing group dynamics, team building, leadership, and communication. P: 45 credit hours completed; Contemporary Composition course.

MGT 341. Advanced Organizational Behavior. 3 credits. OD

Development of an in-depth understanding of behavioral concepts, methods, and skills which underlie managerial competence in preventing and solving problems within and between individuals and groups. Theoretical review of motivation, group dynamics, leadership behaviors, and organizational change. Various laboratory exercises and cases are used to highlight the concepts and furnish practice in applying them to management problems. P: MGT 301.

MGT 351. Personal/Human Resources Management. 3 credits. OD

Management's approach to and the principles for handling the human factor in an enterprise to maximize the productive efficiency of the firm through sound procurement, development, utilization, and maintenance of its human resources. Emphasis placed on personnel theory. Findings of the behavioral and social sciences as they relate to work are integrated with personnel philosophy, policy, and practice. P: MGT 301; Jr. stdg.

MGT 373. International Management. 3 credits. SP

A global perspective of the practice of management. Topics include issues of social responsibility, corporate strategy, communication, and human resource management. P: MGT 301.

MGT 374. Management Of Environmental Risk. 3 credits. OD (Same as EVS 374)

Examination of environmental issues relevant to management decision making. Emphasis on risk analysis related to global/regional and workplace environmental issues. P: Jr. stdg.

MGT 385. Production And Operations Management. 3 credits. FA, SP

Course treats production and operations as a major function area of business and stresses the management of the production and operations function. Where appropriate, quantitative topics are presented and solution techniques introduced to achieve a balanced view. P: BUS 229; Jr. stdg.

MGT 479. Seminar in Management. 3 credits. FA, SP

Exploration and analysis of selected problems and issues in today's business environment. Course content necessarily changes each semester as selected issues are discussed. This course is repeatable as long as topic differs (12 credits). P: MGT 301 or equivalent.

MGT 491. The Management World: A Campus and Travel Course. 3 credits.

This course is designed to provide a capstone travel experience in which students make on-site visits to a variety of organizations known for their business leadership and innovative practice in the field of management. The overall aim is to complement a student's campus-based study of management concepts, processes, activities, and organizations. The course typically includes approximately 15 hours of on-campus study prior to and after the travel portion of the course. The travel portion of the course may involve various destinations. Note: A student in the Heider College of Business may only count up to six credit hours of travel courses toward their 128 credit hour program of study. P: Instructor consent.

MGT 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits. OD

Limited to students who want to develop a more in-depth knowledge of a management subject beyond the regular course coverage and who have a QPA of 3.0 or better. P: Sr. stdg. and Dean's approval.

MGT 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-3 credits. OD

Supervised independent research on topics beyond the regular course coverage. Course is limited to students who have a QPA or 3.0 or better. P: Sr. stdg; DC and Dean's approval.

MKT 319. Principles of Marketing. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course uses a managerial approach to present the fundamental concepts and principles associated with the discipline of marketing, with emphasis on understanding the marketing concept and appropriate marketing strategy. Topics include strategic planning, purchase behavior, marketing research, market segmentation, and traditional marketing mix elements (e.g., product, price, promotion, distribution). P: ECO 203 and 45 completed credit hours.

MKT 325. Franchising And Small Business Marketing. 3 credits. OD

Application of the marketing concept with specific strategies and tactics to the small business enterprise. P: MKT 319; Jr. stdg.

MKT 333. Consumer And Market Behavior. 3 credits. SP

Study of acts of individuals involved in obtaining and using economic goods and services, including the decision processes that precede and determine those acts: consideration of the sociological, psychological, and economic aspects of purchase behavior. P: MKT 319; Jr. stdg.

MKT 335. Sales Management. 3 credits. FA

Role of the sales administrator as a professional marketing executive. Problems of organization, planning and control of sales; formulation of sales policies and management of the sales force. P: MKT 319; Jr. stdg.

MKT 343. Marketing Research. 3 credits. FA

Basic research concepts and techniques; application of research findings to the formulation of marketing policies. P: MKT 319; BUS 229; Jr. stdg.

MKT 353. Advertising And Promotion. 3 credits. FA

The formulation and implementation of marketing communication policies and strategies relative to the total internal and external communication systems. Includes advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, and other marketing communications. P: MKT 333; Jr. stdg.

MKT 355. Services Marketing. 3 credits. OD

Strategies for marketing services. Emphasis on the distinctive challenges and approaches that make marketing of services different from marketing of manufactured goods. P: MKT 319; Jr. stdg.

MKT 363. Global Marketing. 3 credits. FA, SP

Strategic management of international marketing activities of the firm. Planning, organizing, and implementing international marketing programs for industrial and consumer goods. Emphasis on the influence of environmental differences on marketing decisions in various countries. Lecture and case method utilized. P: MKT 319; Jr. stdg.

MKT 366. Marketing Internship. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course is designed to provide students with practical marketing experience by applying marketing concepts and technical skills learned in the classroom. It requires 150 hours with an employer, designated class meetings, written assignments, and oral presentations. Credit for this class is dependent upon a) an interview with the sponsoring employer, b) relevance of the internship to the students marketing course work, and c) approval by the coordinator of Marketing internships in the Department of Marketing and Management. The course is graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory and only 3 hours of internship credit may be used to satisfy graduation requirements. P: Second semester Jr. or higher standing in the Heider College of Business only; IC.

MKT 377. Public Relations. 3 credits. FA

The day when an organization could control its environment are over, if they ever existed. While a firm may control what it says, it must actively manage the process that builds mutually beneficial relationships between organizations and their publics. This is called Public Relations. Students will understand in depth its many aspects: reputation management, crisis communication, and its role in sense-making in organizations. P: MKT 319 and Jr. Stdg.

MKT 453. Sports and Special Event Marketing. 3 credits. FA

This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of strategic marketing concepts and activities as they apply to the sports and special events contexts. Marketing concepts and activities will be examined as they relate to the marketing of sports and marketing through sports. P: MKT 319; Jr. stdg.

MKT 473. Marketing Management: Policy And Strategy. 3 credits. SP

Formulation and application of marketing strategies and policies by the analysis and solution of industrial and consumer goods cases dealing with the market, product, channels, selling, legislation, and the total marketing program. P: MKT 319; MGT 301; FIN 301; Sr. stdg.; marketing majors only.

MKT 479. Seminar in Marketing. 3 credits. FA, SP

Exploration and analysis of selected problems and issues in the marketing area of today's business environment. Course content changes from semester to semester. This course is repeatable as long as topic differs (12 credits). P: MKT 319.

MKT 491. The Marketing World: A Campus and Travel Course. 3 credits.

This major elective is designed to provide a capstone travel experience in which students make on-site visits to a variety of organizations known for their business leadership and innovative practice in the field of marketing. The overall aim is to complement a student's campus-based study of marketing concepts, processes, activities, and organizations. The course typically includes approximately 15 hours of on-campus study prior to and after the travel portion of the course. The travel portion of the course may involve various destinations. P: Senior standing; Marketing majors only; Instructor approval.

MKT 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits. OD

Limited to students who want to develop in-depth knowledge of a marketing subject beyond regular course coverage or to investigate current developments in marketing theory and practice. Course is limited to students who have a 3.0 or better. P: COBA students only; Sr. stdg; DC and Dean's approval.

MKT 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-3 credits. OD

Supervised independent research on topics beyond the regular course coverage. Course is limited to students who have a QPA of 3.0 or better. P: Sr. stdg; DC and Dean's approval.

Faculty

Professors: Beverly J. Kracher, Alexei Marcoux, Stacey M. Menzel-Baker, Matthew T. Seevers

Associate Professors: Todd C. Darnold, M. Lance Frazier, Andrew B. Gustafson, Bryan Johnson, George W. McNary, Eric J. Neuman, Trent Wachner, Deborah Wells, Anne S. York

Assistant Professors: Peter Gallo, Regina M. Taylor

Instructors: Laurie K. Baedke, John M. Blazek, Taylor Keen, Laura Mizaur

Resident Professor: Carolyn Costley

Resident Assistant Professors: Heather Anderson, Eric Peterson

Associate Professor of Practice: Timothy P. McMahon