Program Director: Jeffrey P. Hause
Associate Director: Erin Walcek Averett
Program Office: Hitchcock 303

Rooted in the university’s Christian, Catholic, and Jesuit traditions, the Honors Program relies on the belief, articulated by Pope John Paul II, that “the united endeavor of intelligence and faith will enable people to come to the full measure of their humanity.” Its goal is to foster a community committed to the ongoing education of students and faculty members as fellow seekers for truth. The program seeks individuals of all faiths and backgrounds who are intelligent, well prepared academically, highly motivated, and academically adventurous. The curriculum then immerses these students in an academically rigorous but flexible program of study guided by a faculty mentor who is charged with paying special attention to the personal dimension of learning. The program ultimately understands itself as a fellowship of inquiry whose individual members have dedicated themselves without reserve to love of learning.

Admission

Admission to the Honors Program is by invitation from the Honors Program Advisory Board (or the Honors Program Director or the Dean). Invitations to the Honors Program are sent to those students whose applications to the Creighton College of Arts and Sciences suggest that they would be strong candidates for admission to the Honors Program.

Good Standing

Once admitted to the Honors Program, students must continue to meet the following standards in order to remain in good standing in the program:

  1. They must make acceptable progress towards fulfilling the requirements of the Honors Program. Ordinarily, this means that they should have completed at least six (6) credit hours of Honors courses by the end of their freshman year, 12 by the end of their sophomore year, and 18 by the end of their junior year.
  2. They must maintain a GPA of at least 3.3 for all courses taken at Creighton.
  3. They must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 for all Honors courses taken at Creighton. (This Honors-specific GPA will not be computed until a student has completed at least two Honors courses.)

Honors students found not to be in good standing will be notified and given one semester to remedy the situation. Failure to do so may result in their dismissal from the Honors Program.

Limited Tuition Waiver

Honors students in good standing may apply for 1-3 credit tuition waivers for a given semester, for up to 21 credit hours, subject to Dean's Office Approval.

The Honors Program Core Curriculum provides an alternate path to the University learning outcomes, and Honors students fulfill these requirements in lieu of the Magis Core Curriculum.

All of the Honors Core elements are incorporated into Learning Plans, developed individually by Honors students in close consultation with assigned faculty mentors. The mentoring process shapes Honors students into confident, independent learners who take active roles in their own education and expect the most of themselves. Through their individualized Learning Plans, Honors students integrate their backgrounds and interests with the strengths and Mission of the University and the College. As a general principle, these four-year Learning Plans include courses distributed among the areas of fine arts, foreign languages, history, literature, mathematics, natural science, philosophy, social science, and theology. Students’ Learning Plans are reviewed and approved by their faculty mentors and by the Program Director. While Honors students are expected, therefore, to excel in all areas that characterize a Creighton undergraduate education, fulfillment of these goals is determined on an individual basis rather than by the more structured curricular requirements that apply to other students.

Honors Core Requirements

Foundational Sequence: Honors students take three courses (9 credits) in their first three semesters that introduce them to the Christian, Catholic, and Jesuit intellectual traditions that lie at the heart of a Creighton education within the context of Western civilization and of the pluralistic world we inhabit.

HRS 100Honors Foundational Sequence I: Beginnings of the Christian Intellectual Tradition3
HRS 101Honors Foundational Sequence II: The Rise of the West (: The Rise of the West)3
HRS 200Honors Foundational Sequence III: The Modern World3
Total Credits9

Sources and Methods Courses. Honors students take five courses (15-20 credits) that induce them to think critically about information, assumptions, and arguments found in multiple forms of academic and cultural discourse. Several such courses are offered each semester in a range of academic disciplines.

HRS 300-level Courses15-20
Total Credits15-20

Discipline Distribution Requirements

Fine Arts3
Foreign Language3
History6
Literature6
Mathematics2
Natural Sciences7
Philosophy6
Social Sciences6
Theology6
Total Credits45

Intersections Course.  Honors students are required to take an Intersections course and may select from any such course offered in the College.

One course that fulfills the Intersections Magis Core Requirement or SRP requirement of the Legacy Core.3
Total Credits3

Independent Research Project. Honors students are required to demonstrate their capacity for advanced, self-directed, individual work by completing an approved project within a field in which they specialize. They undertake these projects under the guidance of assigned faculty mentors and present their findings during a campus-wide “Honors Day.”

Honors Day Presentation0
Total Credits0

Courses

HRS 100. Honors Foundational Sequence I: Beginnings of the Christian Intellectual Tradition. 3 credits.

A study of the beginnings of the Christian intellectual tradition. Students acquire an ability to situate the Christian intellectual tradition within the complex cultural context of the ancient Mediterranean world and the Near East. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 101. Honors Foundational Sequence II: The Rise of the West. 3 credits.

A study of the development of Christianity from antiquity through the Reformation, and of its fundamental role in forming and fracturing the broad intellectual underpinnings of Western civilization. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 200. Honors Foundational Sequence III: The Modern World. 3 credits.

A study of the challenges posed by modernity to traditional Christian understandings of the world, and of Christianity's responses to these challenges. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 301. Sources and Methods: The Epistemology of Political Science. 3 credits.

This course is an introduction to the study of politics. The focus will be on methods in the social sciences. That is, we are going to consider ways of knowing in political science. How do we know? The seminar will necessarily deal with paradigms, particularly how paradigms establish both ontological and epistemological bases for research and in so doing establish the boundaries of a discipline. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 303. Sources and Methods: Fuzzy Math Logic. 3 credits.

In the twenty-first century many mechanical devices have gained the ability to react to their environment. For example a clothes dryer can sense the moisture content of its load and adjust the temperature and drying time to do a good job. The critical technology has turned out to be fuzzy controllers, which are used to dry clothes, steer cars, and fly space shuttles. This course covers the basic foundations of fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic. The emphasis is on the modeling of linguistic systems. The second portion of the class will focus on the major applications of fuzzy set theory/fuzzy controllers. Additional topics may include similarity, pattern recognition and fuzzy linear programming. P: Only available to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 304. Sources and Methods: Non-Citizens in Democratic Athens. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course provides a detailed examination of issues pertaining to citizenship and social status in ancient Athens. By studying resident aliens ("metics") and their role under the democracy of the 5th and 4th centuries B.C.E., you will be introduced to the study and practice of ancient history. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 305. Sources and Methods: Intelligence: Multiple Perspectives. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course explores the concept of intelligence from a variety of psychological perspectives. Students will be introduced to the science of psychology and its methodologies using the study of intelligence as the unifying theme. They will read scientific articles, books, and articles from the popular press. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 306. Sources and Methods: Organizational Learning: Finding Your Place in the World. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course focuses on organizational communication and narrative inquiry as a unique means for understanding the world and our places in it. Students draw upon the elements of human agency (Burke) to reflect on how organizational assimilation (socialization and individualization) occurs and how they, as individuals, learn about, interpret, influence, and create organizational change through continuous learning processes. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 307. Sources and Methods: Writing Our Lives: Identity and Culture in Personal Writing. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course invites you to study and practice personal writing in forms ranging from essay to memoir to criticism. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 308. Sources and Methods: The Theology of Medieval Women. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course introduces students to the theology and spirituality of medieval women. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 309. Sources and Methods: Philosophy and Economics: Method and Horizon of Discourse. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course uses Veblen's critique of the foundations of neoclassical economics as an approach to broader questions involving the philosophy of social science, the history of economic thought, the anthropology of economic life, critical social theory, political theory, the history of ethics, and economic history. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 310. Sources and Methods: Metaphysics of Film. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course explores the multiple senses of "film" (long strip of plastic, cinematic art object, separated form, means of understanding the structure of the World) as an approach to the most basic branch of academic philosophy: metaphysics. The course involves a mixture of film viewing, critical reading, classroom discussion and lecture, and on-line activities. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 311. Sources and Methods: Graph Theory. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course is an introduction to what is arguably the best modeling tool ever invented. Graph theory plays a very important role in many fields, including mathematics, computer science, game theory, and project management. Students will conduct research on graph theory to experience the very process of the research itself. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 312. Sources and Methods: Godel, Escher and Bach. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course uses an intensive study of Douglas Hofstadter's Godel, Escher, Bach as an introduction to human creativity and problem-solving ability. Problems like the Zeno Paradox, the Liar's Paradox, and the Prisoner's Dilemma originally seem insurmountable. Yet paradox really means that our assumptions are leading us to jump to unwarranted conclusions; the solution of such puzzles has historically led to some of the greatest discoveries in science and mathematics. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 313. Sources and Methods: European Literary Modernism. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course concerns 20th century European writers of the Modernist movement who consciously broke with 19th century literary traditions in the effort to "make it new" through experimentation in poetry, fiction, and drama. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 314. Sources and Methods: This View of Life -Evolutionary Biology. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course in the Honors Program examines the fundamental concepts of modern evolutionary biology and how they are studied. Students examine the nature of science; the distinction between science and pseudoscience; types of explanation, modes of reasoning, and levels of analysis; and ways by which evolutionary hypotheses may be tested. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 315. Sources and Methods: Imagination to Invention. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course in the Honors Program examines the nature of chemistry as a discipline: what makes it unique, and what unites it to other disciplines? In particular, the course investigates the origin of ideas and concepts in chemistry, and seeks to relate them to basic principles of creative thought. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 316. Sources and Methods: American Identity in the World. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course in the Honors Program examines the ways in which Americans construct themselves and are constructed by others elsewhere in the world. The course explores the ideologies and rhetorical strategies, as well as the material realities and lived experiences, at work in defining what it means to "be" and American, both for those residing in the U.S. and for those who have never set foot on U.S. soil. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 317. Sources and Methods: European Metropolis 1900. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course in the Honors Program is an introduction to the techniques of cultural history. It examines the creation and experience of European capital cities during the turn of the twentieth century, paying particular attention to the artistic and technological innovations that marked this critical period of urbanization. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 318. Sources and Methods: Animals, Persons, and Ethics. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course in the Honors Program introduces philosophical methods by way of the study of the nature of animals, the nature of persons, and the ethical dynamics between persons and animals. The course draws on literary and philosophical texts, ethological studies, and films to examine the complex ethical, social, and metaphysical relationships between persons and animals. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 319. Sources and Methods:The Psychology of Sterotyping, Prejudice and Intergroup Conflict. 3 credits.

Students will develop a scientific understanding of the complex phenomena of stereotyping, prejudice and intergroup conflict by examining how stereotypes are developed and maintained as a result of basic social and cognitive processes and evaluating the various approaches and methods used to research stereotyping in psychology. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 320. Sources and Methods: Cosmology and our Evolving Understanding of the Universe. 3 credits.

This course is an exploration of humanity's ever-changing perception of the universe from the ancient Babylonians to today. We'll cover roughly 3000 years of evolving thought, examining four distinct eras of cosmology: the era of myth/philosophy, the era of enlightenment, the era of revolution, and the era of understanding. We will examine how paradigms shift and how our understanding of the universe has grown enormously in the last century. The course will culminate with a scientific yet non-technical description of the standard big bang model of cosmology along with the observational and theoretical evidence that supports it. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 322. Sources and Methods: The Catholic Church and Latin America. 3 credits.

The Roman Catholic Church has been present in Latin America for over 450 years. Initially an active participant in the conquest and domination by European powers, the Church has fundamentally changed its mission and doctrine over the past 50 years. Students will be introduced to Latin American history and Roman Catholic ecclesiology using the development of doctrine as the unifying theme. They will read primary sources in English and Spanish, books, articles, and scholarly journals. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 324. Sources and Methods: Classics of Social Theory: Positivism and its Discontents. 3 credits.

This course illuminates the common origin of the social sciences in the intellectual currents of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, focusing especially on the texts of Freud, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Levi-Strauss, and Saussure. Students reflect on what we mean by "social," "modernity," "science," "the family," "language," and "the psyche." P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 325. Sources and Methods: Evolution and Human Behavior. 3 credits.

Students will be introduced to the science of psychology and its methodologies using the theories of evolutionary psychology. They will read scientific articles, books, and articles from the popular press. The primary assumption is that the human mind and behavioral predispositions have been shaped by the process of natural selection throughout our evolutionary past. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 326. Sources and Methods: Gender in Classical Antiquity. 3 credits.

By reading and interpreting primary and secondary sources, students examine Greek and Roman ideas about gender including how gender roles governed men and women's lives; how the ancient Greeks and Romans defined and used gender categories in literature, politics, law, religion, and medicine; and how these ancient ideas inform contemporary ones. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 327. Sources and Methods: Greek Tragedy: Texts, Contexts, Subtexts. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course is an introduction to a crucial genre in Western literature. Students will: read the majority of extant Greek tragedies; understand the historical and material circumstances under which the plays were created and performed; and tackle the "macro" interpretive questions to which they give rise. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 328. Sources and Methods: Critical Perspectives of Disability and Society. 3 credits.

Disability is usually viewed as a condition of personal deficit, misfortune, and shame. This course will question practices and discourses through which these negative perceptions are generated and reinforced. Students will explore models of disability, reinterpretations of human variation, and narrative methods used to investigate the personal experience of disability. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 329. Sources and Methods: In Search of the Promised Land: Religion and Place in America. 3 credits.

This course will examine the quest for the Promised Land in diverse religious communities with a particular emphasis on religion and place. Issues for consideration include concepts of home and sacred space, religion and nature, the faith and practices of exile communities, and the influence of border culture on religion. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 330. Sources and Methods: Christian and Jewish Theology after the Holocaust. 3 credits.

In the decades following the Holocaust, the reality of evil, the power and benevolence of God, the nature of covenant, and other key theological concepts became points at which traditional Jewish and Christian theologies were challenged and defended.  This course will investigate these challenges, focusing on the central concept of covenant. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 331. Sources and Methods: Representations of Piracy from 1600 to the Present. 3 credits.

This course examines representations of piracy from 1600 to the present. It considers the process by which pirates have become romanticized rather than censured figures as well as how the idea of piracy functions in terms of the illegal reproduction of various forms of media. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 332. Sources and Methods: "Thugs, Preps and Playas": Critical Approaches to Masculinities. 3 credits.

This class will explore the concepts of manliness over time. Utilizing literature, poetry, film, popular media, and other genres, students in this course will interrogate the meaning behind being a man in contemporary society via multiple lenses such as through spirituality, sports and different nationalities. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 333. Sources and Methods: The Renaissance Artist. 3 credits.

The artist and art historian Giorgio Vasari was the first to use the term "Renaissance" to describe the cultural movement that ran through Europe from approximately 1300-1550  Since then, countless historians in many fields have sought to make sense of the happenings in those centuries, many focusing on the era's chief protagonist: the Renaissance artist.  In this class we will undertake a close study of the surviving documents of Renaissance art literature in an effort to understand better how the men and women of the Renaissance conceived of their time and their world. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 334. Sources and Methods: Green Chemistry and Sustainability. 3 credits.

Chemistry has had many positive impacts on society, such as the development of medicines and many items we take for granted. Many of these items have come at a cost to the environment. Green chemistry considers human beings, our surroundings, and the environment when designing a chemical reaction, experiment, or process. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 335. Sources and Methods: Not Lost in Translation. 3 credits.

This Sources and Methods course in the Honors Program looks at how the Bible has been translated from antiquity to the modern world. Students will situate selected versions and translators within their historical, social, cultural, political, and religious contexts.  They will also learn how to identify and evaluate differing styles of translation.  In addition, students will become familiar with the nuances of different contemporary English versions and will come to recognize how important these differences can be to discussions of topics such as the environment, sexuality, and war. It is not expected that students in this class will have knowledge of either of the major languages in which the Bible was composed, Hebrew and Greek. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 336. Sources and Methods: Theory, Method and Art of Autoethnography. 3 credits.

Autoethnography is both art and science, a reflexive research practice that uses the lens of the self (auto) to describe and write (graphy) about people and cultures (ethno). This course will introduce students to the methodological and theoretical roots of autoethnography, and then guide them in becoming autoethnographic researchers. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 337. Sources and Methods: Women in Music. 3 credits.

This course will explore numerous issues concerning women in music. These may include, but are not limited to: 1) The contributions and roles of women as composers, patrons and performers in Western art music, non-Western art music and popular music, 2) The portrayal of women in opera and Broadway, and 3) Feminist perspectives in musical criticism. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 338. Sources and Methods: Research in Writing of Poetry. 3 credits.

This course will explore the role of research in the inspiration and composition of imaginative writing, specifically poetry. Students will practice various methods used in the process of creating poetry that is inspired and informed by research and learning in areas other than literature. Our central questions will be: How do poets write poems based on research into history, biography, science? What part does research play in the inspiration of poems? How do facts drawn from research and the poetic imagination interact? How do poets - how will you - choose areas to research? Can subject matter be drawn from and expand on, for example, daily interests and activities, such as other courses one is taking? In addition, students will explore the various elements of poetic form and craft. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 339. Sources and Methods: The Age of Augustus. 3 credits.

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to one of the most important eras in history. We will study how a nineteen-year-old youth, Gaius Octavius, became the first Roman emperor, Augustus, and explore the ways the Western world was transformed during his fifty-eight years of power (44 BCE-14 CE). P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 340. Sources and Methods: Introduction to Green Cultural Studies. 3 credits.

This course will introduce students to the field of cultural studies as it emerged in the U.S. and elsewhere, give students a working knowledge of cultural studies as a methodological approach, and facilitate the application of this methodology to environmental texts and issues. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 341. Sources and Methods: The History and Future of the Book. 3 credits.

History of the book as a literate, literary, and cultural artifact; Examination of important trends in text production from ancient times to the present; examination of contemporary directions, including digital venues, in traditional and multimediated bibliotechnology. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 342. Sources and Methods: Modeling Global Issues. 3 credits.

Students will be introduced to issues concerning comparative politics, nuclear stability, economic stability, economic freedom, creative economy, smart power, hard of hearing and deaf children, and the application of mathematical modeling to these and other issues. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 344. Sources and Methods: The Literature of Mysticism. 3 credits.

This course will focus on mysticism, East and West. Jean Gerson, the great 15th-century theologian and churchman, once defined mysticism as "the experiential knowledge of God that comes through the embrace of unitive love." In this course, we will explore the lives and writings of some of the great mystics, those remarkable individuals who claim to have tasted first-hand this "experiential knowledge of God." P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 345. Sources and Methods: The World and Writings of St. Augustine. 3 credits.

St. Augustine (354-430) is among the greatest and most influential of Christian theologians. This course offers in-depth examination of both his career and his theology, exploring his major works (Confessions, On the Trinity, and On the City of God) his doctrine-shaping controversies with Donatists and Pelagians, and his influence on Christian views of creation, Church, sacraments, and grace. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 346. Sources and Methods: Philosophy as Therapy. 3 credits.

We will study the ways philosophers of various eras have employed philosophical therapies (e.g., against emotional turmoil or distorted outlooks on the world). We will explore the strengths and limitations of philosophical therapy and compare its techniques with those of psychological, sociological, and spiritual therapies. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 347. Sources and Methods: Stoics in Film and Literature. 3 credits.

Study of the idea of the stoic as presented in various literary genres, philosophical texts, and films. Examination of the stoic life as portrayed in poems, short stories, novels, treatises, letters, and video media. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 348. Sources and Methods:Pictures and Words: The Visual Book. 3 credits.

Pictures and Words will introduce the student to the history and fine art of photographic materials in books and visual design, as well as present the student with an introductory studio arts course in the hands-on creation of visual books with photographic materials and written text. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 349. Two Philosophical Perspectives. 3 credits.

This course compares philosophies that treat the same issues from instructively different perspectives. Students will learn how different philosophical methods influence the articulation and resolution of problems, and how different conceptual apparatus enable philosophers to engage the same problems differently. May be repeated one time. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 350. Witchcraft, Oracles, and Magic. 3 credits.

This course addresses the variety of ways anthropologists describe and interpret religious phenomena. We will focus in particular on religion within the context of specific human social groups (primarily those which are called “local”). The course culminates in an intensive case study of the East African Azande. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 351. Colonialism and Agency. 3 credits.

This course investigates colonialism and human agency in modern history, with an emphasis on relations between “East” and “West.” It first examines the philosophical and methodological approaches of historical inquiry and then outlines the basic theoretical models for understanding colonialism, agency, and post-coloniality, balancing theory with primary accounts of colonialism. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 352. (SAM): Organizational Rhetoric. 3 credits.

Organizational rhetoric is the strategic use of symbols to generate meanings: communication processes through which organizations influence popular attitudes and public policies. Students use rhetorical critical methods to analyze how people within organizations use language to generate collective identities, to communicate with stakeholders, to reinforce organizational values, and in many ways, to control. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 353. American Classical Music. 3 credits.

The course investigates Western art music from the American perspective - everything from the music of indigenous people, to the New World classical music, to the birth of jazz, film, and Broadway, and the 20th century American avant garde. Students will also develop listening skills for the aural analysis of such music. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 354. Antiquity in Modern Media. 3 credits.

This course will explore the advantages and disadvantages of learning about the Near East, Greece, and Rome through such non-traditional media as the performing arts, games, sports, and graphic novels. It will also introduce students to three methods for studying ancient history: social history, cultural history, and political history. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 355. Biotechnology. 3 credits.

An introduction to biotechnology and its application in a variety of disciplines. Since biotechnology is based on the techniques and tools in several fields, students will learn the details of fields such as molecular biology, biochemistry, bioinformatics, and genetics. We will also explore the ethics of implementing this technology. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 356. Archaeology and Politics. 3 credits.

This class will analyze the political use of the past with a focus on archaeological and artistic cultural monuments in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. We will explore the intertwining of modern political ideologies with the way past cultural heritage is collected, interpreted, presented, and maintained. P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 357. Sources and Methods: Burke, Tocqueville, and the Democratic Revolution. 3 credits.

This course will explore an alternative to the classical liberalism that dominates American thought: the classical conservatism of such thinkers as Burke and deTocqueville. We will pay special attention to the question of that makes for a good society and what moral roles government should take. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 358. Literature Religion Philosophy. 3 credits.

This course examines the ways in which religious activity, beliefs, and aspirations are presented in literature. Can literature convey information about religion that standard academic discussions cannot? Does literature help to convince us that certain religious beliefs are plausible or implausible, or that certain religious aspirations are worthwhile or not? P: Only open to students in the Honors Program.

HRS 359. The Novel as African History. 3 credits.

This seminar examines representations of Africa, Africans and African history in the works of Victorian English and contemporary African writers. Through a critical reading of these works, we will interrogate the ways in which the colonial encounter displaced African and European political, social, cultural, religious, and epistemological formations and values. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 360. The Search for Christian Unity. 3 credits.

This course tackles the daunting task of understanding the root cause of divisions among Christians as well as the ways Christians have attempted to overcome these divisions. The bulk of this course will focus on the phenomenon of the ecumenical movement. P: Membership in the Honors program.

HRS 361. Topics in Political Science. 3 credits.

This course will focus on a specific problem in political science (such as predicting elections, legislative strategy, or collective choice and electoral rules). After learning the concepts, theories, and methods needed to address the semester's topic students will apply that background knowledge to resolve a particular question. P: Membership in the Honors program.

HRS 362. Multiculturalism. 3 credits.

We shall look at the problem of multiculuturalism from a variety of practical and theoretical perspectives, using philosophical, fictional, and autobiographical works addressing encounters between different cultures. What does multiculturalism imply, and how should we best approach ideas and values that may seem alien to our established way of thinking? P: Membership in the Honors program.

HRS 363. Sources and Methods: Opera and the Novel. 3 credits.

Borrowing from dramatic and literary criticism, Opera and the Novel explores the relationship between the two most popular literary and dramatic forms of the nineteenth century, focusing specifically on adaptation, politics, gender, and performance in major operas, plays and novels. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 364. Sources and Methods: Food in the Ancient Mediterranean. 3 credits.

Food in the Ancient Mediterranean explores culture and life through food. Food sustains life and affects health, structures social and economic interactions, and conveys cultural ideals through metaphor and art. This course will draw on biology, anthropology, archaeology, art and literature to illuminate the rich and diverse food culture of the ancient Mediterranean. P: Membership in the Honors Program.

HRS 365. SAM: Chemistry of Brewing. 3 credits.

This course will examine fundamental scientific principles and pathways underlying the transrformation of water, barley, hops and yeast into beer. Students will learn basic chemical analysis and brewing techniques via a combination of lecture instruction and hands-on activities. Must be at least 21 years old to participate. P: Membership in the Honors Program; Instructor Consent.

HRS 366. Sources and Methods: Biology with Darwin. 4 credits.

Students will engage in biological investigations following the work of Charles Darwin. Students will read excerpts of Darwin's scientific writings and personal correspondence and explore the current scientific literature that builds upon his ideas. ln the laboratory, students will replicate classic experiments and test hypotheses based on Darwin's foundational work. P: Membership in the Honors Program and Program Consent.

HRS 367. Christianity & the Rwandan Genocide. 3 credits.

This course analyzes the 1994 genocide in Rwanda through the lenses of theology, history, politics and genocide studies. Particular attention is paid to the roles of religious communities, especially the majority Catholic Church, and questions of identity, violence, and reconciliation. P: Membership in the Honors program.

HRS 390. Special Topics for Honors Students. 3 credits.

This course will address selected topics appropriate for students in the Honors Program. The specific topic will be listed as a course subtitle in the Schedule of Courses. May be repeated under different subtitles.

HRS 493. Directed Independent Study. 1-3 credits.

A course of study in a particular area of interest with a faculty member cooperating with the Honors Program. Limit of three hours. May not be undertaken in the same semester as HRS 497.

HRS 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-3 credits.

Course undertaken in the department of one's major. Students may not register for this course until research has been approved by the departmental research director. May be repeated twice. P: IC.