http://www.creighton.edu/ccas/philosophy

Chair: Amy E. Wendling
Associate Chair: Anne C. Ozar
Department Office: Humanities Center, Room 105

The Department of Philosophy at Creighton University is concerned to arouse and sustain a sense of wonder in students, to acquaint them with the main problems and historical periods in philosophy, to help them form the habit of rigorous and clear thinking, and to prepare them to make philosophically mature decisions during the course of a lifetime.

Majors in Philosophy

Specific Requirements for Admission to the Philosophy Major

At least a “C” in a Philosophical Ideas prerequisite course (PHL 110 Philosophical Ideas:Reality, Knowledge, and the Good Life or PHL 111 Philosophical Ideas:Law or PHL 112 Philosophical Ideas:Foundations of the Sciences or PHL 113 Philosophical Ideas:Nature, Time and God or PHL 118 Philosophical Ideas:Wisdom). A GPA of 2.00 or better in philosophy courses completed at the time of application.

Learning Objectives of the Philosophy Major

Upon completion of the major program, all students will fulfill each of the following learning objectives:

  1. Philosophical Knowledge
    1. Knowledge of the History of Philosophy: Students will analyze and evaluate the ideas and arguments of some major philosophers of the past in the context of the history of philosophy in which those ideas and arguments developed.
    2. Knowledge of the Problems of Philosophy: Students will analyze and evaluate contrasting approaches to some fundamental problems in philosophy.
  2. Philosophical Skills: Students will formulate and defend a position on a philosophical issue on their own.
  3. Philosophical Virtues: Students will express the virtues of humility, respectfulness, good judgment, courage and perseverance in their written work.

Courses

PHL 110. Philosophical Ideas:Reality, Knowledge, and the Good Life. 3 credits.

An exploration of philosophical ideas about the nature of reality, the scope of human knowledge, and the nature of a good human life through the study of primary philosophical texts. Students will study theories and concepts that philosophers of the Western tradition have used to explore these ideas.

PHL 111. Philosophical Ideas:Law. 3 credits.

An inquiry into the nature and purpose of the law in human society and the relationship between the law and reason. Students will analyze and evaluate a variety of Western philosophers' views about these subjects as they prepare to develop and defend their own views on the subjects.

PHL 112. Philosophical Ideas:Foundations of the Sciences. 3 credits.

This course will introduce students to the major philosophical frameworks and underlying philosophical concepts utilized in the sciences such as causality, chance, matter, unity, teleology, possibility, necessity, space, time, substance, and motion, but also the various powers of mind such as perception, understanding, reason, intuition, imagination, and creativity.

PHL 113. Philosophical Ideas:Nature, Time and God. 3 credits.

Every putative "thing" in nature is either in part an eternal idea in the mind of God, or instead an impermanent event, beginning and ending, wholly in time. This course explores those two possibilities, primarily through classical Western philosophy, but also a general introduction to philosophical Buddhism.

PHL 118. Philosophical Ideas:Wisdom. 3 credits.

Philosophy is the love of wisdom. This course studies conceptions of wisdom, reality vs. appearance, knowledge vs. opinion vs. ignorance, and the art of living offered by ancient Greek and Roman philosophers and at least one contemporary philosopher inspired by them.

PHL 147. Introduction To Critical Thinking. 3 credits.

An encounter with logic as an eminently practical and down-to-earth discipline meant to be used in everyday social and business interaction, intended to introduce business students to the basic and indispensable skills of deliberative thinking, with an eye toward application in speaking and writing.

PHL 202. Informal Logic. 3 credits.

A practical study of argument and critical thinking, including an examination of how to recognize and evaluate arguments encountered in everyday media, and how to construct one's own arguments. Topics include: deduction, induction, validity, soundness, criticizing premises, clarifying meaning, uses of language, definition, conceptual theories, informal fallacies, conceptual analysis, causal arguments, analogical arguments, and normative arguments.

PHL 270. Philosophical Ethics. 3 credits.

A critical study of fundamental philosophical theories, including a utilitarian theory, a deontological theory, and a virtue ethics theory, about the nature and sources of moral obligation, moral virtue, justice, wisdom, and a good human life. Students will use these theories to evaluate critically their own ethical presuppositions and to form well-reasoned judgments about how to act in complex practical situations. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course.

PHL 271. Philosophical Ethics: Cortina Community. 3 credits. (Same as JPS 271)

This course is a component of the Cortina Community program. It is a critical study of fundamental philosophical theories, including a utilitarian theory, a deontological theory, and a virtue ethics theory, about the sources of moral obligation, moral virtue, justice, wisdom, and a good human life. Students will use these theories in conjunction with reflection on first-hand experience of serving others to evaluate critically their own ethical presuppositions and to form well-reasoned judgments about moral problems related to social justice. P: Membership in the Cortina Community and one Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course.

PHL 272. Philosophical Ethics: Poverty. 3 credits.

A critical study of fundamental philosophical theories, including a utilitarian theory, a deontological theory, and a virtue ethics theory, about the nature and sources of moral obligation, moral virtue, justice, wisdom, and a good human life. Students will use these theories to evaluate critically their own ethical presuppositions and to form well-reasoned judgments about complex practical problems related to poverty. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course.

PHL 275. Philosophical Ethics: Energy and Environment. 3 credits.

A critical study of fundamental philosophical theories, including a utilitarian theory, a deontological theory, and a virtue ethics theory, about the nature and sources of moral obligation, moral virtue, justice, wisdom, and a good human life. Students will use these theories to evaluate critically their own ethical presuppositions and to form well-reasoned judgments about how to act in complex practical situations, including the practical situation associated with different types of energy technologies and their impacts on the environment. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course.

PHL 300. Ultimate Questions: Spirituality/Philosophy. 3 credits.

This course offers a philosophical perspective on some basic spiritual themes including suffering, compassion, forgiveness, love, death and the nature of ultimate reality. Students will study contemporary and historical discussions of these ideas. They will also be challenged to develop their own position on fundamental spiritual and religious questions. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, one Magis Core The Christian Tradition course, and one Magis Core The Biblical Tradition course.

PHL 309. Meaning in America. 3 credits.

Examination of alternative sources of values in contemporary America. Emphasis will be placed on understanding both the value pluralism of American society and the person's need to articulate and embrace a life's meaning. Strategies for criticism of various contemporary lifestyles will be examined and central dimensions of making intelligent personal choices will be explored. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320 or PHL 399.

PHL 320. Ultimate Questions: God and Persons. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

This course examines, from the viewpoint of rational inquiry, questions concerning God (classic and contemporary arguments on the existence of God and contemporary atheism and agnosticism, the nature of God, approaches toward God, the problem of evil in the light of belief in God) and human personhood (freedom and determinism, human destiny, the meaning of human life). P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, One Magis Core The Christian Tradition course and One Magis Core The Biblical Tradition course.

PHL 321. Epistemology. 3 credits.

Advanced study of human knowledge. Examination of the sources of knowing in reason and sense, grounds for establishing the validity of claims to know, the relationships between various sciences and other methods and ways of knowing. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320 or PHL 399.

PHL 324. Native American World View, Culture and Values. 3 credits. (Same as ANT 324, NAS 324)

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to formulating the varieties of worldviews among Native groups with an emphasis on commonalities and uniqueness among different groups during different historical eras. The course begins by critically looking at reconstructions of Native worldviews in the pre European contact era as constructed by later Natives, anthropologists and ethno historians based on a variety of sources. The course focus on the many media through which Native cosmologies are expressed as well as the historical circumstances that have continued to transform Native cosmologies. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 312, or PHL 320.

PHL 325. The Ostracism Of God And Modern Atheism. 3 credits.

An examination of the historical origins, theoretical foundations, and internal logic of modern atheism. P: Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 328. Philosophy of History. 3 credits.

Examination of some speculative theories about the direction of history from Plato to contemporary authors. Examination of the critical philosophy of history which considers the nature and status of historical knowledge and methods. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 331. Moral Philosophy. 3 credits.

Advanced study of contemporary ethical theories, significant features of the moral life, and applications of both to contemporary moral problems. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and PHL 270 or PHL 271 or PHL 272 or PHL 275.

PHL 332. World Philosophy. 3 credits.

This course looks at different global philosophical traditions - for example, Indian Philosophy, Chinese philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, African philosophy and Western philosophy - from a historical perspective. It considers seminal texts, such as the Upanishads, the Analects, the Daodeching and the Dhammapada; and it looks at comparative themes, such as nature, suffering, violence, human nature, and the meaning of life. P: Philosophical Ideas course and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 333. Philosophy Of The Human Sciences. 3 credits.

Examination of the methodology of the human sciences (e.g., psychology, sociology, political science) and comparison of this methodology with that of the natural sciences. Examination of Continental and Anglo-American criticisms, phenomenological social sciences, hermeneutics, and critical theory. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320 or PHL 399.

PHL 334. Philosophy Of The Natural Sciences. 3 credits.

Investigation of basic concepts in natural science and of the elements of scientific inquiry - law, theory, causality, probability, confirmation and disconfirmation, proof, and scientific change. The history of the natural sciences, especially of the scientific revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries, is used as the context for analyzing these concepts. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 340. Philosophy of Language. 3 credits.

Introduction to some fundamental philosophical problems related to language through the study of classic and contemporary works. Topics such as meaning, reference, truth, and the relationship between meaning and use will be addressed. P: Philosophical Ideas course and one of the following: PHL 398, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 342. Metaphysics. 3 credits.

Advanced study of the philosophy of being, the most general study of reality and its constitutive parts; examination of traditional and contemporary positions on the existence and nature of God, the ultimate character of matter and mind, the nature of being and becoming. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 343. Ethics and the Professions. 3 credits.

Examination of the moral dimensions of the role of the professional in contemporary society with emphasis on the professional-client relationship and the professional's social obligations. Specific moral problems in the various professions will be covered, especially in medicine and law. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 345. Philosophy for Children. 3 credits. (Same as EDU 345)

This course introduces a curriculum aimed at fostering creative and critical thinking for children. Philosophy begins in wonder. This course seeks to reawaken the sense of wonder and protects children's capacity of questioning. A careful examination on the issue from both the theory and practice of doing philosophy with children will be involved. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 348. Philosophy of Feminism. 3 credits. (Same as WGS 348)

An examination of a number of philosophical approaches, such as those rooted in existentialism, liberalism, and Marxism, to issues concerning gender. Topics from fields such as ethics, politics, philosophy of law, epistemology, and philosophy of science will be addressed. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 351. Introduction To Chinese Philosophy. 3 credits. (Same as THL 351)

Origin and development of Chinese philosophy. The basic doctrines and moral principles that the Chinese tradition holds. Different schools of Chinese philosophy, such as Confucianism, Daoism, and Moism. How Chinese philosophy has been practiced in daily life. The conflicts between Chinese tradition and modern China. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, OR PHL 399.

PHL 353. Introduction to Buddhism. 3 credits. (Same as THL 353)

Origin and development of Buddhism's basic doctrines and beliefs. The different schools of Buddhist traditions, and the changes as Buddhism spread from India through China and Japan to the West. How Buddhist teachings are practiced in daily life. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 354. Environmental Ethics. 3 credits. (Same as EVS 354)

Critical study of the anthropocentrism-nonanthropocentrism debate and the individualism-holism debate and how they affect each other in the context of the determination of ecological value. If anthropocentrism is in some ways defective, what implications do these defects have for our moral obligations to animals, plants, waters, soil, future generations, species, ecosystems, and the planet? P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course and one Magis Core Ethics course.

PHL 355. Science, Technology, and Values. 3 credits.

Investigation of ethical issues raised by science and technology in such areas as change of the environment, governmental control of population, restrictions on scientific research, technology assessment, work in a technological society, and genetic manipulation. Also, consideration of science and technology themselves as values, their dominance in our culture and some of the effects of that dominance on other values. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 356. Philosophy of Peace and War. 3 credits.

Examination of philosophical issues related to peace and war. Emphasis on an analysis of the traditional just war theory and on the more extreme alternatives of pacifism and the "war is hell" doctrine. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 357. Bioethics. 3 credits.

An examination of various moral problems raised by new scientific and medical knowledge and power. Emphasis is placed on developing an ethical framework to help resolve moral issues related to the doctor-patient relationship, research with human subjects, suicide, euthanasia, abortion, new genetic technologies, allocation of scarce medical resources, etc. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 358. Social And Political Philosophy. 3 credits.

Critical study of classical and contemporary theories concerning the nature and value of social and political institutions such as the state, the family, and civil society. Examination of the nature and application of political ideals such as justice, freedom, equality, and community. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 359. History of Ethics. 3 credits.

Examination of the history of Western ethical theory from ancients to contemporary philosophers. Emphasis on primary sources. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 360. History of Mediaeval Ethics. 3 credits. (Same as CNE 360)

An investigation of mediaeval ethics, tracing its roots in classical antiquity and religious tradition, outlining its innovations, and outlining the ways in which it lays the foundations of modern ethics. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course and One Magis Core Ethics course.

PHL 365. Classics of Political Thought. 3 credits. (Same as PLS 365)

Critical readings of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Marx, with emphasis on their contributions to contemporary political understanding. P: So. stdg.

PHL 366. St. Thomas and Thomism. 3 credits.

Study of the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas and the subsequent history of Thomistic philosophy, especially in 20th century scholarship. Special emphasis on Thomistic metaphysics, anthropology, ethics, and political thought. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 367. American Philosophy. 3 credits. (Same as AMS 367)

Surveys some of the works of significant figures in philosophy in America, both past and present. Includes classical American philosophy as well as important individuals outside that tradition. Focuses primarily on metaphysical and epistemological themes. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 368. Moral Psychology. 3 credits.

Moral psychology studies issues at the junction of psychology and moral philosophy. This course investigates the nature of motives, intentions, emotions, and choices and their role in explaining our acts. It also explores states of mind (such as negligence, love, and anger) that might render an agent more or less responsible for an act. Other topics for discussion include self-deception, ignorance, and omissions. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 370. History Of Classical Greek Philosophy. 3 credits. (Same as CNE 370)

Examination of the origins and development of Western philosophy during the Classical period in ancient Greece; the pre-Socratics; Socrates and the Sophists; substantial study of the works of Plato and Aristotle. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320 or PHL 399.

PHL 371. History Of Hellenistic Philosophy. 3 credits. (Same as CNE 371)

Examination of the development of Western philosophy after Aristotle during the Hellenistic period in ancient Greece and imperial Rome. The study of Epicureanism (pleasure is the highest good), Stoicism (living in agreement with nature is the highest good), Skepticism (peace of mind is gained by suspending one's judgment on all dogmatic claims to truth), and Neo-Platonism. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, or PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 372. History of Medieval Philosophy. 3 credits. (Same as CNE 372)

Study of St. Augustine and the development of Scholasticism; the Arab commentators; the achievements of St. Thomas Aquinas; Duns Scotus; William of Ockham and the rise of nominalism. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 373. History Of Modern Philosophy. 3 credits.

Study of the development of Western philosophy from Descartes through Kant (1600-1800); examination of the central figures of Continental rationalism and British Empiricism, and the critical philosophy of Kant. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 312, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 374. History Of 19th-Century Philosophy. 3 credits. (Same as GER 374)

Study of important nineteenth-century philosophers such as Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Comte, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Mill; themes include idealism, existentialism, Marxism, and utilitarianism. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 390. Philosophy of Law. 3 credits.

Examination of classical and contemporary views on the nature of law. Examination of the functions of law, ways it is created and changed by emerging social conditions, and concepts of justice and punishment. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 392. Philosophy of Sport. 3 credits. (Same as AMS 392)

Philosophical examination of the nature, meaning, and significance of sport, with special emphasis on the relationships among sport, play, and game. Investigation of ethical issues in sport, including sportsmanship, cheating, drug-testing, sexual equality, competition, and winning. Treatment of the relation of sport to social-political and aesthetic issues. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 394. Utopian Thought. 3 credits.

Examination of some of the classical and contemporary utopian authors: Plato, More, Bellamy, Orwell, and Wright. Some attention to the history of American communal experiments, especially the Hutterite Society. Examination of the philosophical underpinnings of utopianism: questions of class structure, liberty, property, labor, privacy, and implications for a theory of the person and society. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PH 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 398. Introduction to Logic. 3 credits.

A formal study of reasoning and argument encountered in writing. Topics include: schematization of arguments, categorical logic, Venn diagrams, propositional logic, truth tables, inductive logic, validity, soundness, and forms of inference. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course.

PHL 399. Symbolic Logic. 3 credits.

Study of the historical development of logic; the nature of formal systems; truth tables; the method of deduction; propositional calculus; monadic and polyadic predicate logic and first order general predicate logic; axiomatics; introduction to set theory; metalogical problems. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course.

PHL 401. Themes In Contemporary Philosophy. 3 credits.

Examination of topics in philosophy as selected by the professor. Themes are chosen to highlight new developments in philosophy, contemporary expressions of traditional philosophical movements, or recent trends in specific philosophical traditions. Course will be subtitled in the Schedule of Courses. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 404. Bioethics and Society. 3 credits. (Same as HAP 404)

Bioethics and Society explores questions of ethics and social justice arising from present and emerging medical and biotechnologies, e.g. cloning, germline genetic engineering, and nanotechnology. P: One Magis Core Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course.

PHL 410. Stoicism. 3 credits.

Study of the philosophy originated by Zeno of Citium in the Stoa Poikile in Athens around 300 BCE and the influence of Stoicism in the history of Western philosophy. Investigation of the Stoic system of physics, logic, and ethics; the doctrines of naturalism, rationalism, fatalism, providence, cosmopolitanism, autarky, apatheia, and suicide. Possible topics include philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, freedom and determinism, and political philosophy. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 312, or PHL 320.

PHL 413. Philosophy and Literature. 3 credits.

Examination of philosophical concepts and issues crucial to understanding and appreciating works of great literature. Examination of philosophical themes within great literary works and/or literary aspects of important philosophical works. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 415. Thoreau's Walden: Fiction, Poetry, Truth. 3 credits. (Same as AMS 415)

This course is a philosophical exploration of the relations among fiction, poetry and truth, in the context of reading one of the greatest classics of American literature, Henry David Thoreau's Walden. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course or Soph. stdg.

PHL 420. Science and Religion. 3 credits. (Same as SRP 420, THL 420)

This course explores the relationship between science and religion from three perspectives: philosophy of science, scientific theories, and theology. Issues to be studied include: reductionism vs. emergentism, the relationship between God and world (including creation and evolution), the Galileo affair, and Darwin and design. P: PHL 250 or PHL 270 or PHL 275, or THL 250 or THL 270 or One Magis Core Ethics course; Sr. stdg.

PHL 422. Aesthetics. 3 credits.

Examination of fundamental questions concerning art: The origins of art; the aims and purposes of art; the evaluation of art; the notion of beauty; truth in art; censorship, pornography, and art; the value of art. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 424. Philosophy of Mind. 3 credits.

Advanced study of philosophical writings on the relation between mental states and concomitant brain states. Examination of this problem in terms of its history and cultural significance, the metaphysical and methodological assumptions of proposed solutions, and attempts to adjudicate meta-theoretic conflict among said proposals. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 425. Sciences, Ethics & Society. 3 credits.

This course examines how values enter into science at various stages of practice, from the selection of problems to investigate and the ways in which evidence is evaluated to the ways in which science influences public policy and the ways in which science affects technology and our daily practices. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course; Senior standing.

PHL 427. Food, Sex, and the Good Life. 3 credits.

In this course we will reflect philosophically and ethically upon two basic desires that human beings have in common with other animals: the desire for food and sexual desire. We will explore the distinctive ways that these desires are understood and pursued within our human form of life as rational, linguistic, meaning-seeking animals. We will especially consider how these desires are shaped by strong evaluative meanings such that they can be seen as part of a normatively higher, nobler, more meaningful way of life; in short, as part of 'the good life'. P: One Magis Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course; Senior standing.

PHL 430. Rationality And Religious Belief. 3 credits.

An advanced study of central issues in the philosophy of religion, with special emphasis on contemporary discussions of traditional issues, including extended treatment of the faith-reason controversy in light of recent developments in epistemology. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 431. Topics in Moral Philosophy. 3 credits.

This course answers one of the most important questions raised by both western and non-western philosophers: What is the good life, or, what is the best kind of a human being can lead? P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course and One Magis Core Philosophical Ethics course. .

PHL 434. Philosophy Of East Asian Literature And Film. 3 credits. (Same as SRP 434)

This course is a philosophical investigation into the moral values expressed in East Asian literature and film. Study of a wide range of master works will ground an examination of how Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism function in the lives of the peoples of eastern Asia. P: One Magis Core Ethics course; Sr. stdg.

PHL 435. Literature, Philosophy, And Economics: Critical Representations Of Commercial Life. 3 credits. (Same as ENG 435, SRP 435)

This course will explore how literary, philosophical, and economic texts can reveal basic commercial forms such as the commodity, wage, labor, and capital, whose consequences for social justice we will consider. P: Contemporary Composition or Ethics course; Sr. stdg.

PHL 436. Money and the Good Life. 3 credits.

This course explores the present default assumption that achieving a certain level of success in the going economy, together with standard psychological concomitants of that level of success, are sufficient for human happiness. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry; Senior Standing.

PHL 451. Social Justice: Theory and Practice. 3 credits.

Examination of various principles of social justice in conjunction with direct social involvement through community services. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300 PHL 320, PHL 399.

PHL 453. Ethics and Public Policy. 3 credits.

Examination of value-laden issues which underlie the formation and implementation of public policy. Exploration of the relationship between abstract ethical principles and concrete public policy problems in the context of currently troubled environmental, biomedical, education, and social policies. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 454. Environmental Philosophy. 3 credits. (Same as EVS 454)

Examination of a variety of theoretical approaches to philosophical issues concerning individual organisms, species, ecosystems, and the biosphere. Aesthetic, axiological, epistemological, and ontological issues may be addressed. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272 ,PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, PHL 399.

PHL 455. Health Care, Society, And Values. 3 credits.

Philosophical examination of moral issues in medicine with emphasis on the social dimensions of health care and its delivery. Consideration of questions of justice, rights to health care, the social nature of health and disease, etc. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 312, or PHL 320.

PHL 456. Public Health Ethics. 3 credits. (Same as HAP 456, SRP 456)

Lectures and small group discussions focus on ethical theory and current ethical issues in public health and health policy, including resource allocation, the use of summary measures of health, the right to health care, and conflicts between autonomy and health promotion efforts. Student evaluation based on class participation, a group project, and a paper evaluating ethical issues in the student's area of public health specialization. P: One Magis Core Ethics course; Sr. stdg.

PHL 457. Biomedical Ethics: Philosophical and Theological Approaches. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU (Same as HAP 457, THL 457)

This course explores philosophical and theological ethical theories and analyzes and evaluates select issues in biomedicine and health care policy in light of those theories. P: Ethics course; Senior standing.

PHL 459. Marxism. 3 credits. (Same as GER 459, PLS 459)

In-depth study of the philosophical and political writing of Karl Marx, the historical evolution of Marxism, and its impact on contemporary thought. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 460. Humanity and the Concept of the Future. 3 credits. (Same as SRP 460)

This course examines the philosophical concept of time in relation to how one understands oneself as a member of a community that reaches back into the distant past and forward into the distant future, and the intergenerational ethical relations and obligations which emerge from the temporal and historical self-understanding. P: One Magis Core Ethics course; Sr. stdg.

PHL 461. The Role Of Philosophy In Theology. 3 credits. (Same as THL 461)

Examination of the relation between philosophy and theology; their different ways of thinking about God and Revelation; the role that philosophy has played and can play in the development of theological thought; the impact that theological ideas have had on philosophical thought; and the interplay between faith and reason. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 463. Phenomenology. 3 credits.

Examination of the central themes of phenomenology as a method and a movement, including the ideal of a presuppositionless philosophy, the thesis of the natural standpoint and phenomenological reduction, the method of imaginative or eidetic variation, the intuition of essences, and the concepts of intentionality, constitution, and the life-world. Emphasis on the major figures of phenomenology, including Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 464. Selected Topics in Ancient Philosophy. 3 credits. OD (Same as CNE 464)

Topic approach to selected problems or themes in ancient philosophy, or focus on an individual philosopher or school of philosophy. Course will be subtitled in the Schedule of Courses. P: Philosophical Ideas course and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 465. American Pragmatism. 3 credits. (Same as AMS 465)

Examination and critical evaluation of the major works and themes of the American pragmatists: C. S. Peirce, William James, and John Dewey. Includes an examination of their relation to other philosophers. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 467. Existentialism. 3 credits.

Examination of major existentialist philosophies and themes including the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche; the development of twentieth-century existentialism; examination of the works of authors such as Heidegger, Jaspers, Marcel, Sartre, Buber, Camus, Unamuno. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 469. Contemporary Analytic Philosophy. 3 credits.

Survey of the 20th century analytic movement including the thought of Russell, Moore, and Wittgenstein; logical positivism and logical atomism; recent Anglo-American philosophical analysis. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 475. Multiculturalism: History, Philosophy, Literature, and Education. 3 credits. (Same as SRP 475)

An intensive examination of the theory (and practice) of multiculturalism, this course will consider historical, philosophical, literary, and educational perspectives on the encounter between different cultures, and their relevance for the contemporary world. P: One Magis Core Ethics course; Sr. stdg.

PHL 479. The Philosophy of Love and Sex. 3 credits. (Same as WGS 479)

A philosophical investigation of the nature of love, the different kinds of love, the relationship between love and beauty, and between love and sex. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 480. Philosophical Classics. 3 credits.

An intensive examination and comparison of two major texts in the history of philosophy-for example, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Spinoza's Ethics; or Plato's Republic and Rousseau's political writings. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 481. A Major Philosopher. 3 credits.

An intensive examination of the work of one major philosopher. Examples might include Aristotle, Hume, Spinoza, or Kant. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 482. Race In America: Idea And Reality. 3 credits. (Same as AMS 482, BKS 482, HIS 482, PLS 482, SRP 482)

An examination of the idea and reality of race during key phases of U.S. history, with an emphasis on the contemporary situation. To understand the multiple meanings and experiences of race, the course draws on sources from science, literature, law, and philosophy. P: One Magis Core Ethics course; Sr. stdg.

PHL 492. Senior Seminar. 3 credits. SP

Required seminar for all graduating philosophy majors. Examination of a variety of significant topics and texts in contemporary philosophy. Emphasis on discussion, short writing assignments and seminar presentations on authors such as James, Moore, Heidegger, Maritain Wittgenstein, Quine, Foucault, Nagel, McDowell, and Korsgaard. P: Oral Communication course; Contemporary Composition course; Sr. stdg; PHL major.

PHL 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-4 credits.

Subject matter and method to be worked out individually. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Philosophical Ideas course, IC, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 495. Directed Independent Study. 1-4 credits.

Projects on philosophical issues or problems that are not primarily carried out through directed readings. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 398 (was PHL 201), PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

PHL 593. Advanced Readings In Philosophy. 1-4 credits.

Independent readings course worked out individually for the student. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: PHL major and IC.

Faculty

Professors: Elizabeth F. Cooke, Randolph M. Feezell, Jeffrey Hause, J. Patrick Murray, William O. Stephens, Amy Wendling, Richard J. White, Jinmei Yuan

Associate Professors: Jerold Abrams, Kevin M. Graham, Anne Ozar, Jeanne A. Schuler, Eugene E. Selk

Assistant Professors: Michael A. Brown, Marc Johansen, David McPherson, Fr. M. Ross Romero, S.J., Jacob Rump