http://www.creighton.edu/ml

Chair: Erika Kirby
Department Office: Hitchcock Communication Arts 111-B

The Department provides for its major and minor students in French, German, and Spanish, and minor students in Italian, programs of study that are conducive to developing competence in the spoken and written language, with a broad and deep knowledge of the literature and culture of the target languages. The Department offers to its students of Chinese and Japanese a program of study conducive to developing competence in the spoken and written language with insights into the culture of the target languages.

Students who think they may teach French or Spanish in secondary schools must consult with the Education Department, with the Modern Languages and Literatures Department, and with the appropriate agency in the state in which they intend to teach.

Courses

FRN 109. Beginning French for Daily Life I: Online Lab. 1 credit.

The online lab accompanies Beginning French for Daily Life I, which focuses on acquiring essential elements for basic communication and developing practical language skills. In this co-requisite course, students apply their emerging language skills by completing online reading, writing, listening, grammatical, and cultural activities to accompany classroom content. CO: FRN 111.

FRN 110. Beginning French for Daily Life II: Online Lab. 1 credit.

The online lab accompanies Beginning French for Daily Life II, which focuses on acquiring essential elements for basic communication and developing practical language skills. In this co-requisite course, students apply their emerging language skills by completing online reading, writing, listening, grammatical, and cultural activities to accompany classroom content. NOTE: This course is graded pass/fail. P: FRN 111 or placement; CO: FRN 112.

FRN 111. Beginning French for Daily Life I. 3 credits.

This course introduces students to the language by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as providing a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where French is spoken. CO: FRN 109.

FRN 112. Beginning French for Daily Life II. 3 credits.

This course continues to develop the language-learning process by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as providing a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where French is spoken. P: FRN 111 or placement; CO: FRN 110.

FRN 225. Intermediate French. 3 credits.

This course is designed to help students make the transition to natural communication and develop the language-learning process by focusing on the expansion of necessary elements for development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) by using cultural and literary readings as well as grammatical exercises. It also provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where French is spoken. P: FRN 112 or equivalent.

FRN 311. Advanced French I. 3 credits. FA

Development of refined accurate expression in speaking and writing French. P: FRN 225 or equivalent.

FRN 312. Advanced French II. 3 credits. SP

Development of refined accurate expression in speaking and writing French. P: FRN 225 or equivalent.

FRN 314. Business French Communication. 3 credits.

Course focuses on the study of the language and the cultural context specific to business communication in French. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 335. French Conversation. 1 credit.

This course is designed to improve the speaking and understanding skills of the students through practical exercises. Course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. P: FRN 225 or IC.

FRN 411. Advanced Spoken French. 3 credits.

Review of practical structures, building of a practical vocabulary, exercises designed to develop the ability to understand and express oneself orally. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 412. Advanced Written French. 3 credits.

Review of structures, used in written French, vocabulary enhancement, translation techniques, introduction to practical stylistics, exercises designed to develop clear expression in written French. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 522. French Civilization Before The French Revolution. 3 credits. FA

Study of the history, philosophical movements, and general cultural developments in France from the earliest times until 1789. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 524. French Civilization After The French Revolution. 3 credits. FA

Study of the history, philosophical movements, and general cultural developments in France from 1789 to the present time. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 525. Paris, Ville Du Monde (Paris, City Of The World). 3 credits. SU

A travel course designed to offer the novice a comprehensive introduction to the city of Paris. More advanced students will have the opportunity to concentrate on a particular topic of interest while building upon prior knowledge. P: IC only.

FRN 530. Introduction to Literary Analysis. 3 credits. FA

This course is designed to prepare students for upper-level French and Francophone literature courses with a focus on methods used for the interpretation of literary texts through critical and imaginative readings of poetry, theater, and prose. It thus offers a survey of the major genres, styles, and periods of French and Francophone literature. In conjunction with this exposure to important texts, students will develop the critical skills necessary for textual interpretation. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 540. French Literature: Middle Ages. 3 credits.

Study of the texts and literary movements of the Medieval period. Introduction to some of the older works in the original language. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 542. French Literature: Renaissance. 3 credits.

Study of the texts and literary movements of the 16th century. Readings from Rabelais, Montaigne, Ronsard, DuBellay and others. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 543. French Literature: 17th Century. 3 credits.

Study of the texts and literary movements of 17th century France. Readings from Malherbe, Corneille, Descartes, Pascal, Racine, La Fontaine, La Rochefoucauld and others. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 544. French Literature: 18th Century. 3 credits.

A study of the texts and literary movements of 18th century France. Readings from Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Chenier, Rousseau and others. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 548. French Literature: 19th Century. 3 credits.

From “Le Génie du Christianisme” to Naturalism; the most important literary movements; Romanticism, Parnasse and Symbolism, Realism and Naturalism. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 549. French Literature: 20th Century. 3 credits.

Study of works and literary movements from the turn of this century to the present with texts chosen to give both a depth and breadth of understanding for this period. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 550. La litterature francophone africaine. 3 credits.

A survey of major classic and contemporary works by writers from Francophone Subsaharian Africa. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship between history/society and literature, tradition and modernity, colonization and decolonization. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 551. Women Writers In French And Francophone Literature. 3 credits. (Same as WGS 551)

This course offers students the opportunity to read a wide variety of texts written by women in French across the centuries as well as to consider the notion of "ecriture feminine" (feminine writing). Students will explore how women have represented women and gender in French and Francophone literature through the specific lens of French feminist theory. P: One 300-level FRN course or IC.

FRN 554. Le Roman francais. 3 credits. OD

Students will study the evolution of the French Novel, gaining awareness and understanding of the major personalities, events, ideas, and institutions that have shaped the French novel from Medieval times to the mid-20th Century. Refinement of advanced language skills: speaking, writing, reading, and listening. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 557. French Poetry. 3 credits. FA

Close examination and study of selected works from the Middle Ages to the present. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 564. History of the French Language. 3 credits. OD

The development of the French language; general linguistic principles, the Celtic substrata, the Latin base, the various substrata, from the earliest to modern times. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 572. French Cinema. 3 credits. OD

This course is a survey of French cinema. Students will screen, study, and discuss a selection of significant films in chronological order from the works of the Lumiere Brothers through contemporary productions. Historical, aesthetic, and technical aspects of cinematography will be discussed. P: FRN 311 or FRN 312 or IC.

FRN 575. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits.

Designed to meet the special needs of majors in French. Limit of three semester hours. P: IC only.

FRN 595. Special Topics in French and Francophone Literature and Culture. 3 credits.

A consideration of certain themes or issues which serve as an integrated view of French and/or Francophone literature and culture. P: FRN 530.

GER 111. Beginning German for Daily Life I. 4 credits.

This course introduces students to the language by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where German is spoken.

GER 112. Beginning German for Daily Life II. 4 credits.

This course continues to develop the language-learning process by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where German is spoken. P: GER 111 or equivalent.

GER 225. Intermediate German. 3 credits.

This course is designed to help students make the transition to natural communication and develop the language-learning process by focusing on the expansion of necessary elements for development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) by using cultural and literary readings as well as grammatical exercises. It also provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where German is spoken. P: GER 112 or equivalent or IC.

GER 230. Explorations: German Literature in Translation: Love/Magic in 19th and 20th Cent German Lit and Film. 3 credits.

This course, taught in English, offers a survey of literary masterpieces from the German-speaking world for the English langauge reader. The selection emphasizes works of the canon generally included in disucssions of Western world literature in a variety of genres (prose, poetry, drama) from the 19th and 20th centuries. Unifying themes are 'love' and 'magic' and the ways in which they represent human experience in its individual, social and cultural dimensions. Authors include Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Jakob und Wilhelm Grimm, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Sigmund Freud, Franz Kafka, Rainer Maria Rilke, Bertold Brecht and Friedrich Dürrenmatt, and selected early film classics such as "Metropolis" or "Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari." P: One Magis Core Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course.

GER 303. German Literature and Civilization I: From the Middle Ages to 1871. 3 credits.

This advanced language course offers a survey of German literature and civilization from the Middle Ages to 1871 through discussion of literary and non-literary texts, film, music, art and architecture. Students should gain awareness and understanding of the major personalities, events, ideas and institutions that have shaped German literature and culture. Refinement and expansion of advanced language skills: speaking, writing, reading and listening. The course will be conducted in German. P: GER 225 or equivalent or IC.

GER 304. German Literature and Civilization II: From 1871 to the Present. 3 credits.

This advanced language course offers a survey of German literature and civilization from Wilhelmine Germany to the present through discussion of literary and non-literary texts, film, music, art and architecture. Students should gain awareness and understanding of the major personalities, events, ideas and institutions that have shaped German literature and culture. Refinement and expansion of advanced language skills: speaking, writing, reading and listening. The course will be conducted in German. P: GER 225 or equivalent or IC.

GER 321. German For Business And Economics. 3 credits.

Designed for students who wish to develop specialized language competence in business German and to understand economic and administrative aspects of business practice. P: GER 225 or equivalent.

GER 328. Studies In Contemporary German Culture: The Last 25 Years. 3 credits.

Students will explore the different expressions of contemporary German culture. Areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to, German Identity, The Berlin Wall, the Other and minorities, geographical and political differences, German print and electronic media, and the New Germany within the New Europe. Students will investigate these topics through the study of literature, film, political documents, print and electronic media, online radio features and television programs, WWW sources published by German organizations and institutions, and the German Government. This course will be taught in German. P: GER 303 or GER 304 or IC.

GER 335. German Conversation. 1 credit.

This course is designed to improve the speaking and understanding skills of the students through practical exercises. It will include culturally authentic sources like newspapers, radio broadcasts and television excerpts from Germany. Course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. P: GER 225 or IC.

GER 374. History of 19th-Century Philosophy. 3 credits. OD (Same as PHL 374)

Study of important nineteenth-century philosophers such as Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Comte, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Mill; themes include idealism, existentialism, Marxism, and utilitarianism. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

GER 401. The European Union. 3 credits. AY (Same as PLS 401)

Review of European co-operation and integration from the Treaty of Rome in 1958 to the present. Analysis of institutions and politics of the European Union. Issues such as currency integration, international trade, environmental and social regulation, admission of new members and movements of people. P: So. stdg.

GER 411. Introduction To German Literature. 3 credits.

Reading and discussion of major authors and their works as well as German literary movements/periods from the Middle Ages to the present. P: One 300-level GER course or IC.

GER 459. Marxism. 3 credits. OD (Same as PHL 459, PLS 459)

In-depth study of the philosophical and political writing of Karl Marx, the historical evolution of Marxism, and its impact on contemporary thought. P: One Magis Core Philosophical Ideas course, and one of the following: PHL 201, PHL 250, PHL 270, PHL 271, PHL 272, PHL 275, PHL 300, PHL 320, or PHL 399.

GER 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits.

Designed to meet the special needs of majors in German. Limit of three semester hours. P: IC only.

GER 495. Directed Independent Study. 1-3 credits.

For individual students who wish to complete a directed study project that focuses on a topic within the field of German studies. Limit of three semester hours. P: IC only.

GER 525. The New Berlin. 3 credits. SU

Students will explore the culture, history, and politics of Berlin, a city undergoing radical transformation since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and German unification in 1990. Through walking tours and visits to sites such as the museum at Checkpoint Charlie, the Reichstag, and Alexanderplatz, students learn how the history and culture of the past continue to shape the future of Berlin, the new capital of the Federal Republic of Germany. P: IC.

GER 527. German 19th Century Literature. 3 credits.

Reading and discussion of representative movements (Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism), their major authors and works. P: One 300-level GER course or IC.

GER 529. Contemporary German Literature. 3 credits.

Discussion of 20th century German literary movements with special emphasis after 1945. P: One 300-level GER course or IC.

GER 545. German Novelle. 3 credits.

Study of the development and tendencies of the German short novels in the 19th and 20th centuries. P: One 300-level GER course or IC.

GER 568. The Multiplicity Of German Culture: Cultural Differences And Marginality. 3 credits. OD

Students will explore the voices of marginalized groups in Germany. A variety of ethical views will be employed to evaluate the strategies used to marginalize or break down marginalization in social contexts. Students will discover how these groups find expression in German society and what strategies they employ for their survival. Students will study German language, literature, and film while gaining a deeper understanding of the existing relationships between Germany's main culture and the cultures of these marginalized groups. P: One 300-level GER course or IC.

GER 572. Reading German Films. 3 credits. OD

This course offers an introduction to the film analysis and 80 years of filmmaking in Germany. Films from the Weimar Republic to the 21st century are screened and discussed within the context of cultural and political history. The selected films, which range from silent movies to recent works by some of the world's most influential directors, present a broad spectrum of aesthetic and political perspectives that include Expressionism, Nazi propaganda, and post-unification social criticism. P: One 300-level GER course or IC.

ITA 111. Beginning Italian for Daily Life I. 4 credits.

This course introduces students to the language by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Italian is spoken.

ITA 112. Beginning Italian for Daily Life II. 4 credits.

This course continues to develop the language-learning process by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Italian is spoken. P: ITA 111 or equivalent.

ITA 225. Intermediate Italian. 3 credits.

This course is designed to help students make the transition to natural communication and develop the language-learning process by focusing on the expansion of necessary elements for development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) by using cultural and literary readings as well as grammatical exercises. It also provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Italian is spoken. P: ITA 112 or equivalent.

ITA 230. The Human Comedy: Love, Religion and Morality in Boccaccio's Decameron. 3 credits. SP

The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375) is a collection of one hundred stories organized within a historical framework that reflects the values and mentality of Italian society in Boccaccio's time. These stories are told by ten young narrators during a ten-day retreat spent fleeing the 1348 plague that infested Florence. The historical and cultural content of these stories includes views of gender, religious intolerance, the contrast between bourgeois and courtly love, and the importance of human nature. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course or HRS 100 or HRS 101.

ITA 311. Advanced Italian I. 3 credits.

In this advanced Italian course students also refine their communicative skills as they read, write, discuss, and present the most intriguing facts and personalities in Italian history. P: ITA 225 or equivalent.

ITA 328. Studies in Contemporary Italian Culture: 1975-2002. 3 credits.

This course brings to life the past fifty years of Italian history and culture. By watching a popular Italian television series and selected documentaries, by reading a novel and various articles, and by listening to popular music, students will experience Italian student movements, the "lead years," and the historical divide between Southern and Northern Italy. P: ITA 311 or IC.

ITA 335. Italian Practicum. 1 credit.

The purpose of this course is to improve students' Italian speaking skills by offering regular practice in Italian conversation while enhancing their awareness of Italian culture. Course may repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. P: One 300-level ITA course.

ITA 366. Etruscan and Roman Art. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 366, CNE 366)

Sculpture, painting, and the minor arts of the Etrusco-Roman people.

ITA 375. History of Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture. 3 credits. (Same as ARH 375)

The Italian Renaissance studied through the material culture from 1200-1550 with an emphasis on the history of painting, sculpture and architecture. Important figures from the period include Giotto, Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian.

ITA 377. Seventeenth-Century Art and Architecture. 3 credits. (Same as ARH 377)

The Age of the Baroque was one of the most dynamic in Western history. Absolute monarchs such as Urban VIII, Louis XIV, and Peter the Great ruled over growing empires from sumptuous new capital cities. Contact with the New World, Galileo's invention of the telescope, and Newton's discovery of the laws of physics challenged conceptions of the universe and humanity's place in it. A philosophical revolution unfolded led by Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Literature flourished with the works of Shakespeare and Cervantes, while Purcell and Bach wrote the century's soundtrack.

ITA 411. Introduction to Italian Literature. 3 credits.

This course is an introduction to major periods and movements of Italian literature from the Middle Ages to the present.  There will be reading and discussion on selected topics. Course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. P: ITA 311.

ITA 461. The City of Rome in Antiquity. 3 credits. OD (Same as ARH 461, CNE 461)

An Architectural, Artistic, and Social Historical Survey of the city of Rome, concentrating on the ancient city but also tracing its development (as appropriate) through modern times. Political History will be covered to the extent needed to provide a framework for the course, but does not overlap with CNE/HIS 404.

ITA 465. The City of Rome since Antiquity. 3 credits. (Same as ARH 465, CNE 465)

An architectural, urban, and social historical survey of the city of Rome from the end of the Empire, through the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and ending with the modern city. The class will focus on urban history, theory and design, but will cover political history to the extent needed to provide a framework for the course.

ITA 495. Directed Independent Study. 1-3 credits.

For individual students who wish to complete a directed study project that focuses on a topic within the field of Italian. Limit of three semester hours.

ITA 525. Roma: Passeggiate nella Citta Eterna. 3 credits. SU

Study abroad in Rome, Italy: Strolling in the Eternal City. Italy’s capital city, offers students endless opportunities for personal enrichment. It is a cosmopolitan metropolis and a provincial city with a human dimension that provides a wonderful variety of squares, churches, Roman Forum, etc.. Students will learn its rich history and how the people of Rome speak and live as they visit some of Rome’s major public spaces. Students who have already been exposed to Italian in the classroom will be able to use their language skills. P: IC.

ITA 535. Exploring Italy. 3 credits. (Same as CNE 535, ARH 535)

Students will learn the history of culinary culture, including cuisine, food production, and artisanal activity, through a week spent in Umbria. Students will then learn about the great political and artistic patrimony of Italy in the city of Rome, covering all periods of the city but with a special emphasis on the ancient and the modern city.

ITA 572. Italian History and Society in Italian Cinema. 3 credits.

This course will explore Italian history and changes in Italian society from 1900 to the present. Selected Italian films will serve to investigate the shaping of Italian society from the period of Fascism through the changes that occurred in the post-war decades: from the "Resistance" to contemporary social changes. P: One 300 level course or IC.

JPN 111. Beginning Japanese for Daily Life I. 4 credits.

This course introduces students to the language by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Japanese is spoken.

JPN 112. Beginning Japanese for Daily Life II. 4 credits.

This course continues to develop the language-learning process by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Japanese is spoken. P: JPN 111 or equivalent.

JPN 225. Intermediate Japanese. 3 credits.

This course is designed to help students make the transition to natural communication and develop the language-learning process by focusing on the expansion of necessary elements for development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) by using cultural and literary readings as well as grammatical exercises. It also provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Japanese is spoken. P: JPN 112 or equivalent.

JPN 311. Advanced Japanese I. 3 credits.

Development of refined and accurate expression in speaking and writing Japanese. P: JPN 225 or equivalent.

JPN 312. Advanced Japanese II. 3 credits.

Development of refined and accurate expression in speaking and writing Japanese. P: JPN 225 or equivalent.

JPN 313. Contemporary Japanese Culture and Society. 3 credits.

This course is designed to explore the world of Japanese popular culture. Students will gain insight into current Japanese society by examining anime (Japanese animation), music, television programs, sports, literature, and social fads. This interdisciplinary is conducted in English.

RUS 111. Beginning Russian for Daily Life I. 4 credits.

This course introduces students to the language by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Russian is spoken.

RUS 112. Beginning Russian for Daily Life II. 4 credits.

This course continues to develop the language-learning process by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Russian is spoken. P: RUS 111 or equivalent.

SPN 109. Beginning Spanish for Daily Life I: Online Lab. 1 credit.

The online lab accompanies Beginning Spanish for Daily Life I, which focuses on acquiring essential elements for basic communication and developing practical language skills. In this co-requisite course, students apply their emerging language skills by completing online reading, writing, listening, grammatical, and cultural activities to accompany classroom content. CO: SPN 111.

SPN 110. Beginning Spanish for Daily Life II: Online Lab. 1 credit.

The online lab accompanies Beginning Spanish for Daily Life II, which focuses on acquiring essential elements for basic communication and developing practical language skills. In this co-requisite course, students apply their emerging language skills by completing online reading, writing, listening, grammatical, and cultural activities to accompany classroom content. NOTE: This course is graded pass/fail. P: SPN 111 or placement. CO: SPN 112.

SPN 111. Beginning Spanish for Daily Life I. 3 credits.

This course introduces students to the language by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Spanish is spoken. CO: SPN 109.

SPN 112. Beginning Spanish for Daily Life II. 3 credits.

This course continues to develop the language-learning process by focusing on the acquisition of essential elements for basic communication and development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for communicating in daily life situations, as well as provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Spanish is spoken. P: SPN 111 or equivalent or placement; CO: SPN 110.

SPN 113. Beginning Spanish for the Medical Professionals I. 3 credits.

Fundamentals of the pronunciation and structure of Spanish; practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing with emphasis on vocabulary related to medical situations. Designed for students planning careers in medicine, dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy and allied health but open to all. NOTE: This is an alternative beginning-level course to SPN 101. It is not open to those who have already taken SPN 101 and/or SPN 102, and it is open only to nonnative speakers of the language.

SPN 170. Musical Perspectives:Hearing the Hispanic World. 3 credits.

This course presents a series of units that highlight music's connection to a variety of socio-cultural issues and topics relating to the Hispanic world, including colonization, evangelization and acculturation; religious and musical syncretism; race and racism; politics and protest; youth and poverty; poverty and pollution; borders, trafficking and immigration; and globalization, imperialism and identity. CO: COM 101.

SPN 213. Intermediate Spanish for the Medical Professionals I. 3 credits.

This course is designed to help students make the transition to natural communication in the context of medical situations and to develop further all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through the study of vocabulary, dialogues, readings and grammatical exercises pertaining to health-related professions. P: SPN 112 or SPN 113 or equivalent.

SPN 225. Intermediate Spanish. 3 credits.

This course is designed to help students make the transition to natural communication and develop the language-learning process by focusing on the expansion of necessary elements for development of the practical language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) by using cultural and literary readings as well as grammatical exercises. It also provides a broader awareness of and appreciation for the cultures of the countries where Spanish is spoken. P: SPN 112 or equivalent.

SPN 311. Advanced Spanish I. 3 credits. FA, SP

Development of refined accurate expression in speaking and writing Spanish; selected readings. P: SPN 225.

SPN 312. Spanish Grammar in Context. 3 credits. FA, SP

Development of refined and accurate expression in speaking and writing Spanish; selected readings. P: SPN 225.

SPN 313. Advanced Spanish Conversation. 3 credits.

Development of oral communication skills through extensive vocabulary building and its practical application. P: SPN 225.

SPN 314. Communicating In Business I. 3 credits.

Oral and written practice in business communication, developing a business vocabulary, reading of documents and essays relating to business situations, interviewing and translating (English to Spanish/Spanish to English). P: SPN 225.

SPN 316. Spanish Immersion I. 3 credits. SU

This course is designed to offer additional in-depth study of language and culture to intermediate Spanish students while focusing on the four language skills. It will also address verb forms, agreement and the subjunctive and indicative moods. This course may count toward the major or minor in Spanish. P: SPN 225.

SPN 317. Spanish Immersion II. 3 credits. SU

This course covers essential grammar concepts which enable more advanced students of Spanish to improve their overall proficiency. It also reviews previous grammar concepts with special attention to written communication. This course may count toward the Spanish minor or major. P: SPN 225.

SPN 318. Spanish Immersion in the Dominican Republic. 3 credits.

This course offers an intensive learning experience that focuses on language learning through conversations and immersion in the daily life of a Dominican host family. This course complements the knowledge gained during the students’ regular Encuentro Spanish class, allowing them to apply this knowledge in their interactions during the immersions. P: IC; CO: EDP 361.

SPN 331. Medical Spanish I. 3 credits. FA

This course is designed for students who may be planning a career in medicine, dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy and allied health but open to all. It is designed for students who have had prior study of Spanish and who wish to improve their communication - oral and written - skills when dealing with Spanish-speaking persons in a medical context. P: SPN 225.

SPN 335. Spanish Conversation. 1 credit. OD

Course designed to improve oral and comprehensive skills through face-to-face and online discussions, interviews and oral presentations. Focus will be placed on each of the Spanish-speaking countries, the specific topics being determined mainly by current events. Authentic cultural materials such as newspapers, films, radio and television programs will be examined. Course may be repeated for a maximum of three credits. P: SPN 225.

SPN 340. Special Topics in Hispanic Cultures. 3 credits.

This course is designed to develop the language skills and to promote a more sophisticated level of proficiency in oral and written communication in Spanish through grammar review, composition and selected readings based on a specific cultural or literary topic designed and chosen by the instructor of the course. P: SPN 225 or equivalent.

SPN 341. Introduction to Translation. 3 credits.

This course focuses on the improvement of the Spanish language through translation. While studying basic translation theories and translating short texts the students will review the most important and complex structures of the Spanish language. P: SPN 225.

SPN 350. Spanish for Heritage Speaker. 3 credits.

This course has been designed for undergraduate students who learned Spanish at home or in their communities. It is a review of reading and writing materials designed to satisfy the needs of bilingual students who grew up hearing Spanish at home in the context of the United States. The goals of this course are: 1) development of academic reading and writing skills in Spanish, 2) expansion of bilingual range, 3) exposure to academic registers in Spanish, 4) transfer of literacy skills, and 5) development of awareness and appreciation for all varieties of Spanish. P: SPN 225 or IC.

SPN 401. Advanced Spanish Composition. 3 credits. FA

An intense conversation and composition course designed to refine oral production and comprehension in Spanish, while developing advanced reading and writing skills in the target language. P: Six credits at the 300-level.

SPN 415. Social Stratification in the Dominican Republic. 3 credits. (Same as SOC 415, ANT 415)

In this course we will study the nature, causes, and consequences of social inequality and stratification in the Dominican Republic, with particular attention directed to the interaction among class, race and ethnicity, and gender. P: Soph. stdg. and one course from Understanding Social Science.

SPN 421. Civilization and Culture of Spain. 3 credits. FA

The history and culture of Spain from its origins to the present. P: Six credits at the 300-level.

SPN 422. Latin-American Culture and Civilization. 3 credits. SP

A study of the Latin-American culture from Pre-Columbian times to the present, through its history, art, architecture, music, philosophy and education. P: Six credits at the 300-level.

SPN 423. Encuentro Hispano I. 3 credits. SU

An exploration of Latin American culture through in-country learning excursions that may include: city tours, visits to museums, theatre, cinema, and visits to socio-cultural ethnic sites in one or more countries of Latin America. This course may count toward the Spanish minor or major. P: Six credits at the 300-level.

SPN 424. Encuentro Espanol I. 3 credits. SU

Exploration of Spanish culture through city tours, visits to museums, concerts, theater, and cinema, on -site in Spain. This course may count toward the Spanish major or minor. P: Six credits at the 300-level.

SPN 425. Introduction to Literary Analysis. 3 credits. FA, SP

An introduction to literary analysis with readings from Spanish and Latin-American literature. P: One Magis Core Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course; 3 credits in 400-level Spanish.

SPN 426. Survey of Latin-American Literature. 3 credits. FA

Latin-American literature is studied from the Colonial Period to the present, incorporating some of the most influential writers in Spanish America and giving women authors the representation they merit. Readings include texts from Cristobal Colon, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Esteban Echeverria, Ruben Dario, Gabriela Mistral, Octavio Paz, Garcia Marquez, Rosario Ferre, Jorge Luis Borges and Luisa Valenzuela. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 427. Survey of Peninsular Literature. 3 credits. SP

Through the reading of selections from Spain's major literary works, this course introduces some of the most important issues in Peninsular social history and analyzes the different perspectives that have evolved with every new literary movement. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 430. Communicating in Business II. 3 credits.

Oral and written practice in business communication, developing a business vocabulary, reading of documents and essays relating to business situations, interviewing and translating. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 431. Medical Spanish II. 3 credits. SP

This course is designed for students who may be planning a career in medicine, dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy and allied health but open to all. The course focuses on issues surrounding immigrant health in the U.S. It is intended for students who have had prior study of Spanish and who wish to improve their understanding of these issues when dealing with Spanish-speaking persons in a medical context. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits.

Designed to meet the special needs of majors in Spanish. Limit of three semester hours. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 496. Independent Study in the Dominican Republic. 3 credits. SU

This course offers the students the opportunity to work with faculty guidance on a topic or topics chosen in consultation between the faculty member and the student. This course is limited to students studying in the Dominican Republic. Limit of three semester hours. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 502. Advanced Spanish Translation. 3 credits. SP

Focused on the translation of short texts: literature, media, technical, medial or diplomatic, contemporary situations. Through intensive study of techniques behind the exercise of translation, students will learn how to recognize and adapt the socio-linguistic parameters of Spanish and English to the context and the needs of the translation. P: One Magis Core Ethics course; Six SPN credits at the 400-425 level.

SPN 525. Encuentro Espanol II. 3 credits. SU

An exploration of Spanish culture through city tours, visits to museums, theatre, cinema, concerts, on-site in Madrid, and/or other locals in Spain. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 528. Encuentro Hispano II. 3 credits. SU

An in-depth exploration of Latin American culture through in-country learning that allows for study and analysis of society. These hands-on studies vary and may include visits to socio-cultural ethnic sites, literature, and film in one or more countries of Latin America. This course will be taught in Spanish. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 540. Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature. 3 credits.

This course provides a dynamic vision of Spanish literature through short narratives, poetry, and drama produced during the 18th and 19th centuries. It will cover the main literary movements of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism. Students will read a selection of works from authors most representative of those periods. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 541. Medieval Spanish Literature. 3 credits.

This course provides an insight to the most important writings of the Spanish Middle Ages and focuses on the three masterpieces of the period (Mio Cid, Libro de Buen Amor and La Celestina), but also emphasizes other poetic genres such as ballads and cancioneros. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 542. Golden Age Literature. 3 credits.

A study of the major literary figures of the Spanish Golden Age (16th and 17th centuries) such as Garcilaso, Quevedo, Cervantes and others. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 543. Don Quixote. 3 credits.

This course will be a close reading of Cervantes' masterpiece Don Quixote, often referred to as the first modern novel, and second most published and read book after the Bible.  Students will learn to recognize the different literary genres involved in the making of Don Quixote as well as to contextualize the work within Golden Age Spain. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 547. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. 3 credits.

This course explores the last three decades of 19th Century in Spain where the novel becomes a new approach to observe social domains. It will be concentrated on the work of five major authors: Juan Valera, Benito Perez Leopold Alas (Clarin), Emilia Pardo Bazan and Vicente Blasco Ibanez. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 550. Literature Of The Colonial Period. 3 credits.

Study of the major works from Columbus to Juana Ines de la Cruz. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 551. Latin-American Novel. 3 credits.

An introduction to the Latin-American novel, literary movements and techniques focusing on major writers such as Garcia Marquez, Vargas Llosa, Luisa Valenzuela, Isabel Allende, and others. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 552. The Latin-American Short Story. 3 credits.

Study of the Latin-American short narrative from the 19th century to the present. Selected stories by Echeverria, Garcia Marquez, Rosario Ferre, Elena Poniatowska, Julio Cortazar, Jorge Luis Borges, and others. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 554. Twentieth-Century Latin-American Poetry. 3 credits.

A study of Latin-American poetry from the Vanguardista period to the contemporary scene. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 555. Twentieth-Century Latin American Theatre. 3 credits.

A study of Latin-American theater from the end of the 19th century to the present. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 559. Contemporary Peninsular Spanish Literature. 3 credits.

This course will give students the opportunity to approach Contemporary Peninsular Spanish Literature through a close reading of key works in narrative, poetry and theater. It will cover the era of the transition from the Francoist regime to today's multiregional democracy (1950-2000). Students will read a selection of works from authors most representative of this time period. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 560. Contemporary Latino(a) Literature. 3 credits.

Analysis of works by contemporary authors of Hispanic descent born or residing in the United States. It will include, but will not be limited to, the following authors: Richard Rodriguez, Julia Alvarez, Cristina Garcia, Sandra Cisneros, Roberto Fernandez, Sandra Benitez and Esmeralda Santiago. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 561. From the Generation of 1898 to the Avant-Garde. 3 credits.

Reading and analysis of the major works of the following novelists and nonfiction writers: Unamuno, Valle-Inclan, Baroja, and Azorin. P:Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 563. Feminine Voices from Latin America and Spain. 3 credits.

This course focuses on the writings by some of the most representative female writers from Latin-America and Spain. Particular attention will be paid to women's roles in society and to the specific themes chosen and their social political significance. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 564. History Of The Spanish Language. 3 credits.

This course will present the development of the Spanish language, using linguistic methodology and representative texts. P: SPN 312.

SPN 565. Nineteenth Century Latin-American Novel. 3 credits.

This course studies the evolution of the Latin American novel from the period immediately before the independence from Spain until the Modernism at the end of the century. It will examine the main literary movements from Romanticism to Modernism and its relationship with the historical evolution of the region and with the development of Latin American nationalisms. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 568. Multicultural Spain Through Letters, Politics, Theater And Film. 3 credits.

This course offers in-depth examination of the cultural plurality of Spain. Through a variety of texts including short stories, plays, essays, poetry, music, and film, students will explore how different art forms contribute to the concept of national identity. The focus will be on 20th century works. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 570. Contemporary Peninsular Film. 3 credits.

This course focuses on the analysis of cinematographic production in Spain in the post-Franco era. The Nuevo Cine Espanol echoes the cultural and artistic preoccupations of the transition years. Students will view and discuss seven significant films by key directors such as Julio Medem, Pedro Almodovar, Bigas Luna and Alejandro Amenabar. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 571. Latin American Film. 3 credits.

This course offers a panoramic view of contemporary films from and about the Latino/a world. Through the viewing of movies and the reading of contextual and theoretical information students will explore how film can be considered a legitimate art form that contributes to an ongoing cultural dialogue. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 595. Directed Independent Readings. 1-3 credits.

Designed to meet the special needs of majors in Spanish. Limit of three semester hours. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

SPN 599. Senior Seminar. 3 credits. FA, SP

A Senior Capstone course integrating knowledge and skills acquired within the major. All language skills are refined, as depth and nuance are added to the understanding of Hispanic literatures and cultures. Students will submit an individual research project and a reflective essay examining how their project serves as the culmination of their Spanish studies. P: Six credits at the 401-425 level.

Faculty

Professor: Julian Arribas

Associate Professors: Thomas F. Coffey, Joseph McClanahan, Roxana C. Recio, Enrique Rodrigo, Ivelisse Santiago Stommes

Associate Professor Emeritus: Gloria Romero-Downing

Assistant Professors: Olaf E. Böhlke, Joel Lemus, Ryan Spangler, David S. Vanderboegh

Assistant Professor Emeritus: Donald Gibbs