Social Work

http://www.creighton.edu/ccas/social-work/

Program Director: Monica White

The Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program is part of the Department of Cultural and Social Studies. The Social Work program's mission is "The purpose of the Creighton Social Work program is to facilitate learning experiences integrating both the art and science of social work practice. Social work students are educated to join with, assess and utilize best practices to address the needs of vulnerable and marginalized populations. Integrating knowledge with care of the whole person is not only the cornerstone of a Jesuit education but required for accreditation, certification and licensure for the social work profession. This department provides "hands-on" learning experiences whenever feasible and provides quality supervision and support during the learning process to enhance the capacity and resiliency of our students."

The goals of the Social Work program are:

  1. Prepare undergraduate generalist social work practitioners, grounded in evidence-informed practice, to work with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities including an understanding and applicability of the global perspective for practice.
  2. Prepare entry level generalist practitioners who apply ethical decision-making based on the National Association of Social Work Code of Ethics and the Ignatian charisms, integrating personal and professional ideals through mature self-evaluation and self-reflection.
  3. Prepare social work leaders committed to advancing social and economic justice and human rights along with reducing social and economic inequities in society.

The Social Work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Specific requirements for Admission to the Social Work program

  • Successful completion of SWK 261 Social Welfare Needs of Vulnerable Populations:Exploring Helping Role from Social Work Perspective or SWK 275 Human Behavior and the Social Environment
  • PSY 201 Introductory Psychology, SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology: Self and Society
  • a minimum GPA of 2.5
  • Admission to the program is selective and is based upon an application process that includes: the declaration of the major, a written application and student assessment.
  • The application process must be completed and admission determined before students may register for SWK 345 Practice I: Social Work with Individuals and Families.

Major Requirements (33 credits)

Course Requirements
SWK 261Social Welfare Needs of Vulnerable Populations:Exploring Helping Role from Social Work Perspective3
SWK 275Human Behavior and the Social Environment4
SWK 298Economics, Policy and Social Welfare3
SWK 345Practice I: Social Work with Individuals and Families3
SWK 346Pre-Practicum1
SWK 359Practice II: Social Work with Groups3
SWK 435Practice III: Advocacy, Injustice, Oppression and Ethical Decision-making3
SWK 460Field Practicum Seminar I2
SWK 461Field Practicum I4
SWK 480Field Practicum Seminar II3
SWK 481Field Practicum II4
Total Credits33

CSWE standards require that social work majors enter their careers with solid foundations in relevant content areas. Students should, therefore, be alert to the following required support courses.

PSY 201Introductory Psychology3
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology: Self and Society3
Select one of the following: 3
Political Science Research Methods
Applying Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology
Assessment and Evaluation
Research Design for the Social Sciences
Qualitative Methods, Ethnography, and Engagement

In order to be eligible for field placement, a student must have achieved a minimum GPA of 2.5 in all required courses for the Social Work major and must be certified ready for practicum as detailed in the Social Work Student Handbook & Field Practicum Manual.

Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in SWK 261, SWK 275, SWK 298, PSY 201, SOC 101 and Research courses. 

Students must earn a grade of "C+" or better in: SWK 345, SWK 346, SWK 359, SWK 435, SWK 460, SWK 461, SWK 480, SWK 481.

Students may re-take the course 1 time to achieve the required grade.

Courses

SWK 261. Social Welfare Needs of Vulnerable Populations:Exploring Helping Role from Social Work Perspective. 3 credits. FA, SP, SU

How do people become vulnerable? Is social welfare a private issue or a public concern? How are the needs of the vulnerable identified and addressed? This course identifies several social welfare issues such as poverty, homelessness, family neglect and abuse, mental health, health care and criminal justice. All of these areas are inherently complex revealing issues of social justice. Through study of research, exploration of cultural, personal and religious values this course examines how Social Work, like many disciplines works to assist, amend or alleviate the vulnerability of individuals, families and communities. CO: COM 101.

SWK 275. Human Behavior and the Social Environment. 4 credits. FA, SP

Why do people behave as they do? Is it genetics, psychological conditioning, or influences from the social environment? This course provides foundational knowledge and skills to examine human behavior across the lifespan from the biological, psychological, sociological, spiritual, and cultural theoretical/developmental perspectives. It is a cross-disciplinary, intersectional approach to understanding human behavior.

SWK 289. Self-Care for the Helping Professions. 1 credit. FA, SP (Same CRJ 289)

This course provides students the opportunity to practice the Ignatian value of cura personalis by caring for the whole person. As an integrative, multi-modal approach that borrows from several theories and practices such as the spiritual exercises, yoga, breath-work, compassion fatigue and stress- management the students will explore the relationship between the mind and body to strengthen the emotional spirit. Self-care is an important practice management tool and as such students will develop self-care strategies to use while in the practice setting to enhance professional resilience. This course may be repeated once. This course is offered Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

SWK 298. Economics, Policy and Social Welfare. 3 credits. SP

Examines the process of social policy development with a focus on the more vulnerable populations. Social policy will be placed in a historical and a social context. Includes skills needed for policy formulation and analysis.

SWK 299. Addictions: Substances, Processes and People. 3 credits. ONY (Same as CRJ 299)

Selected addiction theories and treatments are reviewed including substance addiction (alcohol, drugs), process addiction (gambling, sex, food, internet), and relationship addictions. Students examine the role of social workers, other professionals and friends in recognizing and managing addictive behaviors, and explore their own beliefs and values using a systems perspective.

SWK 345. Practice I: Social Work with Individuals and Families. 3 credits. FA

Introduction to the ethical and theoretical base from which generalist social workers practice. Brief overview of the methods employed by social workers providing services. P: SWK 261 and SWK 275 or permission of instructor; CO: SWK 346; SWK major.

SWK 346. Pre-Practicum. 1 credit. FA

Integrating course knowledge in a practice setting is the goal of pre-practicum. Under the supervision of a social worker students explore the ethical and theoretical base from which generalist social workers practice. Taken concurrently with SWK 345 Practice I Generalist Practice with Individuals & Families, the course begins the field practicum experience that distinguishes the social work degree. This is a 40 hour off-campus community experience; students need to have access to reliable transportation and be able to provide 2-hour blocks of time that can be dedicated to the community based experience. P: SWK 275, SWK 261 or instructor permission; CO: SWK 345; Social Work major.

SWK 359. Practice II: Social Work with Groups. 3 credits. SP

Introduces students to the theory, concepts and experience in the development of group dynamics and effective group skills. Stresses development of practice skills and strategies to achieve effective group facilitation. P: SWK major; SWK 261; SWK 275; Magis Oral Communication course.

SWK 371. Social Work Issues. 1-3 credits. OD

Social work issues are examined in terms of both their historical development and their implications for current social work practice. Topics vary from semester to semester. Students may repeat course for credit up to 3 times with program director approval.

SWK 375. Working With the Elderly. 3 credits. OD

Presentation of information concerning the theory and practice of social services to the aged. Study of both institutional and community settings.

SWK 376. Family Violence. 3 credits. ENY (Same as CRJ 376)

An exploration of the problem of family violence in American society. Issues raised by violence on the family examined from the legal, social welfare and criminal justice perspectives.

SWK 377. Grief, Loss & Bereavement. 3 credits. ENY

Grief and loss are universal human experiences, yet helping professionals are often ill-equipped to support those they serve effectively through these times. This course explores issues related to death, grief, and loss throughout the lifespan to increase students' understanding, skill, and comfort in future practice. Theories and interventions are explored through developmental and cross-cultural perspectives. P: Sophomore standing.

SWK 399. Trauma Care for the Whole Person. 3 credits. ONY (Same as ANT 399, SOC 399, CRJ 399)

It is essential for social workers and helping professionals to be reflective practitioners and know how to effectively care for others as well as themselves. Students will explore the distinctions of trauma including: physical, psychological, social, historical, ongoing, and vicaríous trauma. This course is designed to examine the impact of trauma on the mind, body and spirit. Trauma care is not only for the individuals, families and/or communities with whom they work but also to develop resiliency in the mind, body and spirit of the helping professionals. P: Sophomore standing.

SWK 435. Practice III: Advocacy, Injustice, Oppression and Ethical Decision-making. 3 credits. FA

This course prepares undergraduate social work practitioners to advance client/system well-being through the advocacy approach. Focus is on applying the concepts and principles of advocacy for social and economic justice with marginalized and disenfranchised populations. Emphasis is on constructing and using ethical and professional social work frames of reference for practice and understanding the interlocking nature of race, class and gender in alleviating oppression and discrimination. P: SWK 345, SWK 346, Magis Core Ethics course; CO: SWK 460, SWK 461; SWK major.

SWK 460. Field Practicum Seminar I. 2 credits. FA

Seminar designed to integrate theories and skills learned in the classroom with their application in field experience. P: SWK 345; SWK 346; CO: SWK 461, SWK 435; SWK major.

SWK 461. Field Practicum I. 4 credits. FA

Students are placed in community agencies delivering social welfare services for practical application of the theory and skills acquired in the classroom. On-site supervision provided by the agency and group supervision provided on campus. This course includes 220 hours community based field practicum experience. Students need to have access to reliable transportation. P: SWK 345, SWK 346. CO: SWK 460, SWK 435; SWK Major.

SWK 480. Field Practicum Seminar II. 3 credits. SP

Seminar designed to integrate theories and skills learned in the classroom with their application in 220 hour practicum field experience. Students complete a capstone project and presentation demonstrating mastery of the social work process. P: Magis Core Contemporary Composition course, Magis Core Critical Issues in Human Inquiry course, SWK 460, SWK 461, Senior standing, SWK major. CO: SWK 481.

SWK 481. Field Practicum II. 4 credits. SP

Students are placed in agencies delivering social welfare services for practical application of the theory acquired in the classroom. On-site supervision provided by the agency and group supervision provided on campus. This course includes 220 hours community based field practicum experience. Students need to have access to reliable transportation. P: SWK 460, SWK 461. CO: SWK 480; SWK Major.

SWK 491. Assessment and Evaluation. 3 credits. FA, SP (Same as ANT 491, CRJ 491)

This course familiarizes students with foundational approaches to and research methods for needs assessment and program evaluation commonly used in the social sciences, particularly in anthropology. They will design and implement a specific project collecting, analyzing and interpreting data, culminating in a presentation of their results and conclusions. P: Critical Issues in Human Inquiry, Oral Communication, Understanding Social Science, Mathematical Reasoning.

SWK 493. Directed Independent Readings. 1-6 credits. FA, SP, SU, W

Survey of literature related to a topic in social work not covered in student's course work. Undertaken in close cooperation with a supervising faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Sr. stdg or Program Director approval; SWK Major.

SWK 495. Directed Independent Study. 1-6 credits. FA, SP, SU, W

Student-initiated project on a focused topic in social work, utilizing library materials and involving close cooperation with a supervising faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Sr. stdg. or Program Director approval; SWK Major.

SWK 497. Directed Independent Research. 1-6 credits. FA, SP, SU, W

Student-initiated empirical project on a focused topic in social work, involving close coordination with a supervising faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of six hours. P: Sr. stdg.; SWK Major.